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  1. Osmolarity-independent electrical cues guide rapid response to injury in zebrafish epidermis

    This article has 2 authors:
    1. Andrew S. Kennard
    2. Julie A. Theriot

    Reviewed by eLife, preLights

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 4 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Zebrafish: The zebrafish is a premier model organism for biomedical research, with a rich array of tools and genomic resources, and combining these with a fuller appreciation of wild zebrafish ecology could greatly extend its utility in biological research.

  2. Plant secondary metabolite-dependent plant-soil feedbacks can improve crop yield in the field

    This article has 11 authors:
    1. Valentin Gfeller
    2. Jan Waelchli
    3. Stephanie Pfister
    4. Gabriel Deslandes-Hérold
    5. Fabio Mascher
    6. Gaétan Glauser
    7. Yvo Aeby
    8. Adrien Mestrot
    9. Christelle A.M. Robert
    10. Klaus Schlaeppi
    11. Matthias Erb
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents findings that are important for understanding plant-soil feedbacks in agriculture. The authors use a large-scale agricultural field experiment to demonstrate the role of root-emitted secondary metabolites in enhancing the yield of the next crop. By using a benzoxazinoid-deficient maize genotype, the authors provide compelling evidence that biomass production and grain yield of several wheat varieties can be increased when grown in soil conditioned by maize plants able to release benzoxazinoids.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Maize: Comparing maize to its wild ancestor teosinte advances our understanding of how it and other cereal crops evolved, and also identifies the genetic variation that can contribute to important agricultural traits.

  3. Pre-existing chromosomal polymorphisms in pathogenic E. coli potentiate the evolution of antibiotic resistance by MCR-1 plasmid acquisition

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Pramod K. Jangir
    2. Qiue Yang
    3. Liam P. Shaw
    4. Julio Diaz Caballero
    5. Lois Ogunlana
    6. Rachel M. Wheatley
    7. Timothy R. Walsh
    8. Craig MacLean
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      Evaluation Summary:

      This paper combines evolution experiments with genomic analysis of environmental samples to study the evolution of colistin resistance in E. coli. It highlights the importance of pre-existing genomic variations in clinical strains in driving the evolution of antibiotic resistance. The results presented here are relevant for clinical and non-clinical microbiologists studying antibiotic resistance to last-resort drugs like colistin. The design of the research is simple and elegant, and the genomic data analysis connects the in vitro findings to the real world. However, the authors could better align the experimental and clinical data, and better clarify their experimental design choices.

      (This preprint has been reviewed by eLife. We include the public reviews from the reviewers here; the authors also receive private feedback with suggested changes to the manuscript. Reviewer #1 and Reviewer #2 agreed to share their name with the authors.)

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Escherichia coli: A better understanding of the remarkable diversity, natural history and complex ecology of E. coli in the wild could shed new light on its biology and role in disease, and further expand its many uses as a model organism. The revised version along with the full decision letter and author responses can be found on eLife with the title ‚ÄėPre-existing chromosomal polymorphisms in pathogenic E. coli potentiate the evolution of resistance to a last-resort antibiotic‚Äô.

  4. Regulation of anterior neurectoderm specification and differentiation by BMP signaling in ascidians

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Agnès Roure
    2. Rafath Chowdhury
    3. Sébastien Darras

    Reviewed by Review Commons

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Ciona intestinalis: The life cycle and morphology of the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis shed light on vertebrate evolution. We liked reading the scientific discussion provided thanks to the author responses posted in the Article activity feed.

  5. Mutational robustness changes during long-term adaptation in laboratory budding yeast populations

    This article has 2 authors:
    1. Milo S. Johnson
    2. Michael M. Desai
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      Evaluation Summary:

      Johnson and Desai previously reported "increasing cost epistasis", where mutations tended to have more deleterious effects in higher fitness backgrounds. Here they use the same system as before to investigate adapting populations by introducing a set of 91 mutations at multiple time points. As expected, the mean fitness effect of the mutations does decline in most (but not all) populations as they adapt but the effect is weaker than in the previous work, and in another condition, mean fitness effects of mutations do not change as the populations adapt. They suggest an intriguing interpretation (among others) that the "control coefficient" of selection on growth shifts between different genetic modules over time.

      (This preprint has been reviewed by eLife. We include the public reviews from the reviewers here; the authors also receive private feedback with suggested changes to the manuscript. Reviewer #2 agreed to share their name with the authors.)

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Budding yeast has informed our understanding of molecular biology and genetics for decades, and learning more about its natural history could fuel a new era of functional and evolutionary studies of this classic model organism.

  6. The AUX1-AFB1-CNGC14 module establishes longitudinal root surface pH profile

    This article has 9 authors:
    1. Nelson BC Serre
    2. DaŇ°a Wernerov√°
    3. Pruthvi Vittal
    4. Shiv Mani Dubey
    5. Eva Medveck√°
    6. Adriana Jelínková
    7. Jan Petr√°Ň°ek
    8. Guido Grossmann
    9. Maty√°Ň° Fendrych
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents valuable findings that relate the pH pattern along the root surface of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana to the auxin response and gravitropic (changes in growth orientation) response. The evidence supporting the claims of the authors is solid, based on the observation of dynamic responses at a second-to-minute time scale and the systematic correlation between the observed changes in the longitudinal surface pH profile and changes in growth rate. The work will be of interest to a wide range of plant biologists working on plant development and responses to the environment.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Arabidopsis thaliana: Research in molecular ecology and evolution is increasingly utilising the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, placing a spotlight on its natural history.

  7. Removal of extracellular human amyloid beta aggregates by extracellular proteases in C. elegans

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Elisabeth Jongsma
    2. José María Mateos
    3. Collin Y. Ewald
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      Using a newly developed C. elegans model of Alzheimer's disease that expresses Abeta aggregates extracellularly, the authors provide convincing evidence of a disintegrin and an ortholog of human ADAM9 that participate in removing these extracellular aggregates. The worm model presented in this important paper may be very useful to the Alzheimer Disease field.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Caenorhabditis elegans: To leverage the tools, resources and knowledge that exist for C. elegans so that we can study ecology, evolution and other aspects of biology, we need to understand the natural history of this important model organism.

  8. Interplay between historical and current features of the cityscape in shaping the genetic structure of the house mouse ( Mus musculus domesticus ) in Dakar (Senegal, West Africa)

    This article has 13 authors:
    1. Claire Stragier
    2. Sylvain Piry
    3. Anne Loiseau
    4. Mamadou Kane
    5. Aliou Sow
    6. Youssoupha Niang
    7. Mamoudou Diallo
    8. Arame Ndiaye
    9. Philippe Gauthier
    10. Marion Borderon
    11. Laurent Granjon
    12. Carine Brouat
    13. Karine Berthier

    Reviewed by Peer Community in Ecology

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Mus musculus: Studies of the house mouse have provided important insights into mammalian biology, and efforts to study wild house mice and to create new inbred strains from wild populations have the potential to increase its usefulness as a model system.

  9. Neural mechanisms of parasite-induced summiting behavior in ‚Äúzombie‚ÄĚ Drosophila

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Carolyn Elya
    2. Danylo Lavrentovich
    3. Emily Lee
    4. Cassandra Pasadyn
    5. Jasper Duval
    6. Maya Basak
    7. Valerie Saykina
    8. Benjamin de Bivort
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The phenomenon of summit disease, where complex animal behaviours are controlled by single-celled parasites, captivates biologists and non-scientists alike. In this valuable study, the authors use a laboratory model (Drosophila melanogaster infected with Entomophthora muscae) for this disease to provide compelling evidence for the neuroanatomical and physiological underpinnings of summit disease. This is an excellent example of how seemingly intractable questions in behavioural ecology can be effectively addressed in laboratory settings using decades of work in creating 'models' for biology.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Drosophila: After decades of intensive research, D. melanogaster and its relatives could provide important tools for investigating future biological questions about human health and environmental change, but only if we better understand their natural history.

  10. Thermoprotection by a cell membrane-localized metacaspase in a green alga

    This article has 11 authors:
    1. Yong Zou
    2. Igor Sabljińá
    3. Natalia Horbach
    4. Adrian N. Dauphinee
    5. Anna √Ösman
    6. Lucia Sancho Temino
    7. Marcin Drag
    8. Simon Stael
    9. Marcin Poreba
    10. Jerry Ståhlberg
    11. Peter V. Bozhkov

    Reviewed by Arcadia Science

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Dubbed the 'green yeast', the model alga C. reinhardtii has profoundly advanced many areas of biology, but much remains to be learnt about its life in the wild.

  11. Extensive age-dependent loss of antibody diversity in naturally short-lived turquoise killifish

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. William J Bradshaw
    2. Michael Poeschla
    3. Aleksandra Placzek
    4. Samuel Kean
    5. Dario Riccardo Valenzano
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      Evaluation Summary:

      This study introduces the killifish as a potential model for immune aging and immunosenescence and characterizes the changes in age-associated immune-repertoire. The authors convincingly show a decrease in diversity of the large expanded B-cell clones that is greater than small clones and a more pronounced change in the intestinal antibody repertoire with age. These results strongly suggest that killifish undergo age-related immunosenescence. Adding functional measures of the immune system would strengthen this conclusion.

      (This preprint has been reviewed by eLife. We include the public reviews from the reviewers here; the authors also receive private feedback with suggested changes to the manuscript. Reviewer #2 agreed to share their name with the authors.)

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Nothobranchius furzeri: The turquoise killifish from ephemeral pools in African savannah combines extremely short lifespan with a standard vertebrate body plan ‚Äď ideal attributes for a laboratory animal.

  12. Organ-Founder Stem Cells Mediate Post-Embryonic Neuromast Formation In Medaka

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Karen Gross
    2. Tuńü√ße Raif
    3. Ali Seleit
    4. Jasmin Onistschenko
    5. Isabel Krämer
    6. Lazaro Centanin

    Reviewed by Review Commons

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Medaka: Studies of medaka and other ricefishes in the wild could provide insights in fields such as evolutionary biology, development and cancer research.

  13. The costs of competition: high social status males experience accelerated epigenetic aging in wild baboons

    This article has 9 authors:
    1. Jordan A. Anderson
    2. Rachel A. Johnston
    3. Amanda J. Lea
    4. Fernando A. Campos
    5. Tawni N. Voyles
    6. Mercy Y. Akinyi
    7. Susan C. Alberts
    8. Elizabeth A. Archie
    9. Jenny Tung
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      Evaluation Summary:

      In this paper, the authors collect epigenomic data from a well-studied wild baboon community, which they use to construct an epigenetic clock, a method of measuring "biological age" that is increasingly used as a tool in human aging research. The authors find that deviations between biological and chronological age can in part be explained by social phenomena. In particular, for male baboons, maintaining social dominance may play an important role in accelerating the dimension of aging indexed by this measure. This is a foundational study for social-biological-health research.

      (This preprint has been reviewed by eLife. We include the public reviews from the reviewers here; the authors also receive private feedback with suggested changes to the manuscript. Reviewer #1 and Reviewer #2 agreed to share their names with the authors.)

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 4 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Baboon: Wild baboons are an excellent model to study complex evolutionary processes such as speciation and hybridization, as well as the links between sociality, longevity and reproductive success.

  14. The white-footed deermouse, an infection-tolerant reservoir for several zoonotic agents, tempers interferon responses to endotoxin in comparison to the mouse and rat

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Ana Milovic
    2. Jonathan V. Duong
    3. Alan G. Barbour
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study provides a comprehensive whole genome transcriptomic analysis of three small mammals, including Peromyscus leucopus, after exposure to endotoxin lipopolysaccharide. The authors find that the inflammatory response of the three species is complex and that P. leucopus responds differently compared to mice and rats. The data are convincing and constitute an important advance in our understanding of inflammatory responses in animals that serve as reservoirs for relevant pathogens.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 7 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Peromyscus and the Rattus norvegicus: The deer mouse has emerged as a model system for studying many aspects of biology, supported by extensive historical knowledge of its fascinating and varied natural history. The Norway rat, similarly is much more than a simple model, and a better appreciation of the natural history of wild rats would increase its value as a research organism.

  15. Direct and transgenerational effects of an experimental heat wave on early life stages in a freshwater snail

    This article has 2 authors:
    1. Katja Leicht
    2. Otto Seppälä

    Reviewed by Peer Community in Ecology

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Lymnaea stagnalis: The great pond snail is a multipurpose model organism and a contemporary choice for addressing a wide range of biological questions, problems and phenomena in the laboratory and the field.

  16. Goal-directed vocal planning in a songbird

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Anja T. Zai
    2. Anna E. Stepien
    3. Nicolas Giret
    4. Richard H.R. Hahnloser
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important work identifies a previously uncharacterized capacity for songbirds to recover vocal targets even without sensory experience. While the evidence supporting this claim is solid, with innovative experiments exploring vocal plasticity in deafened birds, additional behavioral controls and analyses are necessary to shore up the main claims. If improved, this work has the potential for broad relevance to the fields of vocal and motor learning.

    Reviewed by eLife, PREreview

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 4 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Zebra finch: The genetic and behavioral diversity of the zebra finch, both in the wild and in captivity, make it well-suited for neuroethological studies of vocal learning, culture, and social bonding.

  17. Higher social tolerance is associated with more complex facial behavior in macaques

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Alan V. Rincon
    2. Bridget M. Waller
    3. Julie Duboscq
    4. Alexander Mielke
    5. Claire Pérez
    6. Peter R. Clark
    7. J√©r√īme Micheletta
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study shows important evidence of the correlation between social tolerance and communicative complexity in a comparison of three macaque species. Notably, the authors use an innovative, detailed methodology for quantifying facial expressions during social interactions. The results are convincing regarding a positive association between social complexity and facial behaviour, which should stimulate further comparative research in this field.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 7 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Rhesus macaque: The rhesus macaque is a non-human primate that is widely used as a model organism in ecology, evolutionary biology and behavioural science.

  18. Gain of gene regulatory network interconnectivity at the origin of vertebrates

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Alejandro Gil-G√°lvez
    2. Sandra Jiménez-Gancedo
    3. Rafael D. Acemel
    4. Stephanie Bertrand
    5. Michael Schubert
    6. Héctor Escrivá
    7. Juan J. Tena
    8. José Luis Gómez-Skarmeta

    Reviewed by preLights

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity

    eLife - the journal

    Amphioxus: Interest in the ecology, biology and evolution of amphioxus is growing, and the availability of several species is helping to improve our understanding of chordate evolution.