1. Female-dominated disciplines have lower evaluated research quality and funding success rates, for men and women

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Alex James
    2. Franca Buelow
    3. Liam Gibson
    4. Ann Brower
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife Assessment

      This study provides convincing evidence that the quality of research in female-dominated fields of research is systematically undervalued by the research community. The authors' findings are based on analyses of data from a research assessment exercise in New Zealand and data on funding success rates in Australia, Canada, the European Union and the United Kingdom. This work is an important contribution to the discourse on gender biases in academia, underlining the pervasive influence of gender on whole fields of research, as well as on individual researchers.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 7 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  2. Have AI-Generated Texts from LLM Infiltrated the Realm of Scientific Writing? A Large-Scale Analysis of Preprint Platforms

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Huzi Cheng
    2. Bin Sheng
    3. Aaron Lee
    4. Varun Chaudary
    5. Atanas G. Atanasov
    6. Nan Liu
    7. Yue Qiu
    8. Tien Yin Wong
    9. Yih-Chung Tham
    10. Yingfeng Zheng

    Reviewed by preLights

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  3. Sci-comm “behind the scenes”: Gendered narratives of scientific outreach activities in the life sciences

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Perry G. Beasley-Hall
    2. Pam Papadelos
    3. Anne Hewitt
    4. Charlotte R. Lassaline
    5. Kate D. L. Umbers
    6. Michelle T. Guzik

    Reviewed by preLights

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  4. Gendered hiring and attrition on the path to parity for academic faculty

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Nicholas LaBerge
    2. Kenneth Hunter Wapman
    3. Aaron Clauset
    4. Daniel B Larremore
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      Efforts to increase the representation of women in academia have focussed on efforts to recruit more women and to reduce the attrition of women. This study - which is based on analyses of data on more than 250,000 tenured and tenure-track faculty from the period 2011-2020, and the predictions of counterfactual models - shows that hiring more women has a bigger impact than reducing attrition. The study is an important contribution to work on gender representation in academia, and the evidence in support of the findings is convincing.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  5. An analysis and metric of reusable data licensing practices for biomedical resources

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Seth Carbon
    2. Robin Champieux
    3. Julie A. McMurry
    4. Lilly Winfree
    5. Letisha R. Wyatt
    6. Melissa A. Haendel

    Reviewed by PREreview

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  6. Experts fail to reliably detect AI-generated histological data

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Jan Hartung
    2. Stefanie Reuter
    3. Vera Anna Kulow
    4. Michael Fähling
    5. Cord Spreckelsen
    6. Ralf Mrowka

    Reviewed by preLights

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  7. Scientific civility and academic performance

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Emma Camacho
    2. Quigly Dragotakes
    3. Isabella Hartshorn
    4. Arturo Casadevall
    5. Daniel L Buccino

    Reviewed by preLights

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  8. Analysis of science journalism reveals gender and regional disparities in coverage

    This article has 2 authors:
    1. Natalie R Davidson
    2. Casey S Greene
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important bibliometric analysis shows that authors of scientific papers whose names suggest they are female or East Asian get quoted less often in news stories about their work. While caveats are inevitable in this type of study, the evidence for the authors' claims is convincing, with a rigorous, and importantly, reproducible analysis of over 20,000 articles from across 15 years. This paper will be of interest to science journalists and to researchers who study science communication.

    Reviewed by eLife, preLights

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  9. Finding the right words to evaluate research: An empirical appraisal of eLife’s assessment vocabulary

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Tom E. Hardwicke
    2. Sarah R. Schiavone
    3. Beth Clarke
    4. Simine Vazire

    Reviewed by preLights

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  10. More than a token photo: humanizing scientists enhances student engagement

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Robin A. Costello
    2. Emily P. Driessen
    3. Melissa K. Kjelvik
    4. Elizabeth H. Schultheis
    5. Rachel M. Youngblood
    6. Ash T. Zemenick
    7. Marjorie G. Weber
    8. Cissy J. Ballen

    Reviewed by PREreview

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity