Showing page 1 of 13 pages of list content

  1. The genetic architecture of the load linked to dominant and recessive self-incompatibility alleles in Arabidopsis halleri and A. lyrata

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Le Veve Audrey
    2. Genete Mathieu
    3. Lepers-Blassiau Christelle
    4. Ponitzki Chloé
    5. Céline Poux
    6. Vekemans Xavier
    7. Durand Eleonore
    8. Castric Vincent
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents valuable empirical work and simulations that are relevant for the evolution of genetic load linked to self-incompatibility alleles in Arabidopsis. The evidence supporting the findings is solid but could be improved by a more detailed quantitative assessment of the impacts of deleterious alleles and their dominance. The simulation results are somewhat incomplete, as details of the approach and code do not appear to be available, but this could be easily remedied. The work will be of relevance to geneticists interested in the evolution of allelic diversity in similar systems.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  2. Recent evolutionary origin and localized diversity hotspots of mammalian coronaviruses

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Renan Maestri
    2. Benoît Perez-Lamarque
    3. Anna Zhukova
    4. Hélène Morlon
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      Maestri et al report the absence of phylogenetic evidence supporting codiversification of mammalian coronaviruses and their hosts, leading to the important conclusion that the evolutionary history of the virus and its hosts are decoupled through frequent host switches. The evidence for frequent host switching, derived from a probabilistic model of co-evolution, appears convincing, but evidence for quantitative statements about the time of the last common ancestor of extant mammalian coronaviruses remains incomplete. The results would be strengthened by a reconstruction of the evolutionary timescale and further investigation of robustness to sampling biases and unsampled diversity.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  3. Early evolution of the ecdysozoan body plan

    This article has 13 authors:
    1. Deng Wang
    2. Yaqin Qiang
    3. Junfeng Guo
    4. Jean Vannier
    5. Zuchen Song
    6. Jiaxin Peng
    7. Boyao Zhang
    8. Jie Sun
    9. Yilun Yu
    10. Yiheng Zhang
    11. Tao Zhang
    12. Xiaoguang Yang
    13. Jian Han
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study provides a fundamental advance in palaeontology by reporting the fossils of a new invertrebrate, Beretella spinosa, and inferring its relationship with already described species. The analysis placed the newly described species in the earliest branch of moulting invertebrates. The study, supported by convincing fossil observation, hypothesizes that early moulting invertebrate animals were not vermiform.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  4. How did UGA codon translation as tryptophan evolve in certain ciliates? A critique of Kachale et al. 2023 Nature

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Estienne Carl Swart
    2. Christiane Emmerich
    3. Kwee Boon Brandon Seah
    4. Minakshi Singh
    5. Yekaterina Shulgina
    6. Aditi Singh
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The manuscript explores the ways in which the genetic code evolves, specifically how stop codons are reassigned to become sense codons. The authors present phylogenetic data showing that mutations at position 67 of the termination factor are present in organisms that nevertheless use the UGA codon as a stop codon, thereby questioning the importance of this position in the reassignment of stop codons. Alternative models on the role of eRF1 would reflect a more balanced view of the data. Overall, the data are solid and these findings will be valuable to the genomic/evolution fields.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  5. Coevolution with toxic prey produces functional trade-offs in sodium channels of predatory snakes

    This article has 9 authors:
    1. Robert E. del Carlo
    2. Jessica S. Reimche
    3. Haley A. Moniz
    4. Michael T.J. Hague
    5. Shailesh R. Agarwal
    6. Edmund D. Brodie
    7. Edmund D. Brodie
    8. Normand Leblanc
    9. Chris R. Feldman
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable study describes an investigation of the properties of two heterologously-expressed Nav1.4 channels, with mutations close to the selectivity filter found in tetrodotoxin(TTX)-resistant snakes. The authors studied these mutants by electrophysiological methods, assessed the muscle properties of two types of snakes bearing these mutations, and built homology models of the channels to hypothesize a molecular explanation of the altered channel properties. The methods employed and the results are generally solid, although some aspects would benefit from additional experiments and a more nuanced discussion.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  6. Biocalcification in porcelaneous foraminifera

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Zofia Dubicka
    2. Jarosław Tyszka
    3. Agnieszka Pałczyńska
    4. Michelle Höhne
    5. Jelle Bijma
    6. Max Janse
    7. Nienke Klerks
    8. Ulf Bickmeyer
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This manuscript provides important information on the calcification process, especially the properties and formation of freshly formed tests (the foraminiferan shells), in the miliolid foraminiferan species Pseudolachlanella eburnea. The evidence from the high-quality SEM images is solid, but the evidence is incomplete when it comes to the specificity of the auto-fluorescent signals for calcified structures, or the presence of photosynthetic (living) symbionts, which are not verified experimentally. The conclusions based on fluorescent imagery therefore do not have strong support.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  7. Analyses of allele age and fitness impact reveal human beneficial alleles to be older than neutral controls

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Alyssa M. Pivirotto
    2. Alexander Platt
    3. Ravi Patel
    4. Sudhir Kumar
    5. Jody Hey
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      Drawing on a human population genomic data set, this valuable study seeks to show that potentially advantageous alleles are on average older than neutral alleles, invoking the action of balancing selection as the underlying explanation. Currently it is unfortunately unclear how robust the estimates of allele ages are, and the evidence for the authors' proposal is therefore at this stage incomplete. If confirmed, the conclusions would be of interest to population genomicists, especially those studying humans.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  8. Experimental evolution for the recovery of growth loss due to genome reduction

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Kenya Hitomi
    2. Yoichiro Ishii
    3. Bei-Wen Ying
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important report studies the recovery of genome-reduced bacterial cells in laboratory evolution experiments to understand how they regain their fitness. Through the analysis of gene expression and a series of tests, the authors discover distinct molecular changes in the evolved bacterial strains and propose that various mechanisms are employed to offset the effects of a reduced genome. While the findings have intriguing implications for understanding genome evolution, it is crucial to note that the evidence supporting these claims is incomplete due to insufficient experimental tests and statistical analysis.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  9. Random genetic drift sets an upper limit on mRNA splicing accuracy in metazoans

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Florian Bénitière
    2. Anamaria Necsulea
    3. Laurent Duret
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This fundamental study evaluates the evolutionary significance of variations in the accuracy of the intron-splicing process across vertebrates and insects. Using a powerful combination of comparative and population genomics approaches, the authors present convincing evidence that higher rates of alternative splicing tend to be observed in species with lower effective population size, a key prediction of the drift-barrier hypothesis. The analysis is carefully conducted and has broad implications beyond the studied species. As such, it will strongly appeal to anyone interested in the evolution of genome architecture and the optimisation of genetic systems.

    Reviewed by eLife, Peer Community in Evolutionary Biology

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity
  10. Stochastic parabolic growth promotes coexistence and a relaxed error threshold in RNA-like replicator populations

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Mátyás Paczkó
    2. Eörs Szathmáry
    3. András Szilágyi
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study provides a valuable theoretical exploration of non-enzymatic sustained replication of RNA systems, in the parabolic growth regime of the evolution of putative primordial replicators. It provides solid evidence that parabolic growth mitigates the error threshold catastrophe, thus demonstrating another way in which this regime contributes to the maintenance of genetic diversity, although the justification of modeling choices and of parameter values is sometimes incomplete. The findings shed light on relevant evolutionary regimes of primordial replicators, with potential applicability to our understanding of the origin of life.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  11. Inversions Can Accumulate Balanced Sexual Antagonism: Evidence from Simulations and Drosophila Experiments

    This article has 2 authors:
    1. Christopher S. McAllester
    2. John E. Pool
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable study introduces a new simulation model to explain the wide-spread occurrence of genetic inversions in fruit-fly genomes, based on sexually antagonistic alleles and a trade-off between male reproduction and survival. The evidence supporting the conclusions is currently incomplete, but it might be possible to address this with additional simulations and experiments as well as more rigorous analysis of the model and the data. The work will be of interest to population geneticists beyond the fruit-fly system.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  12. A scenario for an evolutionary selection of ageing

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. T. Roget
    2. C. MacMurray
    3. P. Jolivet
    4. S. Méléard
    5. M. Rera
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      Through a theoretical approach, this study makes important contributions to our understanding of the evolutionary causes of the ageing process. Using a simple individual-based model and computational simulations, the authors provide convincing evidence that ageing can be a trait under natural selection, opening the door for further discussion in the context of lifespan extension research.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  13. Archaic introgression contributed to shape the adaptive modulation of angiogenesis and nitric oxide induction in human high-altitude populations from the Himalayas

    This article has 15 authors:
    1. Giulia Ferraretti
    2. Paolo Abondio
    3. Marta Alberti
    4. Agnese Dezi
    5. Phurba T. Sherpa
    6. Paolo Cocco
    7. Massimiliano Tiriticco
    8. Marco di Marcello
    9. Guido Alberto Gnecchi-Ruscone
    10. Luca Natali
    11. Angela Corcelli
    12. Giorgio Marinelli
    13. Davide Peluzzi
    14. Stefania Sarno
    15. Marco Sazzini
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This useful study applies solid and previously validated methodology to identify archaically introgressed genes involved in high altitude adaptation. However, to test the robustness of the approach, this study would benefit from using at least one other method to detect adaptive introgression, and clarification on how the authors scored the networks in the signet analysis. With these parts strengthened, this paper would be of interest to population geneticists, anthropologists, and scientists interested in the genetic basis underlying high-altitude adaptation in Tibet.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  14. Evolutionary rate covariation is a reliable predictor of co-functional interactions but not necessarily physical interactions

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Jordan Little
    2. Maria Chikina
    3. Nathan L Clark
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This useful study seeks to address the importance of physical interaction between proteins in higher-order complexes for covariation of evolutionary rates at different sites in these interacting proteins. Following up on a previous analysis with a smaller dataset, the authors provide compelling evidence that the exact contribution of physical interactions, if any, remains difficult to quantify. The work will be of relevance to anyone interested in protein evolution.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  15. The evolution of transposable elements in Brachypodium distachyon is governed by purifying selection, while neutral and adaptive processes play a minor role

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Robert Horvath
    2. Nikolaos Minadakis
    3. Yann Bourgeois
    4. Anne C. Roulin
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable study seeks to disentangle the different selective forces shaping the evolutionary dynamics of transposable elements (TEs) in the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon. Using haplotype-length metrics, and genetic and environmental differentiation tests, the authors present convincing evidence that positive selection on TE polymorphisms is rare and that the distribution of TE ages points to purifying selection being the main force acting on TE evolution in this species. This study will be relevant for anyone interested in the role of TEs in evolution and adaptation.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 7 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  16. Emergence of catalytic function in prebiotic information-coding polymers

    This article has 2 authors:
    1. Alexei V. Tkachenko
    2. Sergei Maslov
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable study uses a model to determine when catalytic self-replication of polymers can emerge from a random pool of replicating polymers. The model accounts for the folding and function of polymers in addition to abstract evolutionary dynamics, providing solid evidence for the claims of the authors. The work will be of relevance to those interested in the origin of life, artificial cells, and evolutionary dynamics.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  17. Multiple origins of cephalic sutures in trilobites and their relatives

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Kun-sheng Du
    2. Jin Guo
    3. Sarah R. Losso
    4. Stephen Pates
    5. Ming Li
    6. Ai-lin Chen
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The authors present 16 new well-preserved specimens from the early Cambrian Chengjiang biota. These specimens potentially represent a new taxon which could be useful in sorting out the problematic topology of artiopodan arthropods - a topic of interest to specialists in Cambrian arthropods. Because the anatomic features in the new specimens were neither properly revealed nor correctly interpreted, the evidence for several conclusions is inadequate.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  18. Evolutionary trade-offs in dormancy phenology

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Théo Constant
    2. F. Stephen Dobson
    3. Caroline Habold
    4. Sylvain Giroud
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This review examines seasonal dormancy in various species, including hibernating mammals (excluding bats and bears) and ectotherms. It tests hypotheses on dormancy timing, considering energetic constraints and life history as alternative drivers. While the review is valuable, ecological differences between males and females can drive differences in energy balance, hence the idea that sex differences in dormancy timing are associated with non-energy constraints. Evidence supporting a life-history hypothesis is therefore somewhat incomplete. Nonetheless, examining these alternative hypotheses is of interest to evolutionary biologists, and including a diverse range of species, population-level traits, and some ecological context would enhance the value of the review.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  19. Longer mandible or nose? Co-evolution of feeding organs in early elephantiforms

    This article has 11 authors:
    1. Chunxiao Li
    2. Tao Deng
    3. Yang Wang
    4. Fajun Sun
    5. Burt Wolff
    6. Qigao Jiangzuo
    7. Jiao Ma
    8. Luda Xing
    9. Jiao Fu
    10. Ji Zhang
    11. Shi-Qi Wang
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents fundamental findings on the evolution of extremely elongated mandibular symphysis and tusks in longirostrine gomphotheres from the Early and Middle Miocene of northern China. The integration of multiple methods provides compelling results in the eco-morphology, behavioral ecology, and co-evolutionary biology of these taxa. In doing so, the authors elucidate the diversification of fossil proboscideans and their likely evolutionary responses to late Cenozoic global climatic changes.

    Reviewed by PREreview, eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity
  20. Not so local: the population genetics of convergent adaptation in maize and teosinte

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Silas Tittes
    2. Anne Lorant
    3. Sean McGinty
    4. James B. Holland
    5. Jose de Jesus Sánchez-González
    6. Arun Seetharam
    7. Maud Tenaillon
    8. Jeffrey Ross-Ibarra
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This potentially important study examines patterns of diversity and divergence in two closely related sub-species of Zea mays, patterns that have bearings on local adaptation in maize and teosinte at intermediate geographic scales. The authors suggest that convergent evolution has been facilitated by both standing variation and gene flow, with independent selective sweeps in the two species. Limitations concerning population sampling, false positive rates in sweep detection and integration of phenotypic data at this stage only inadequately support the major conclusions. The work should in principle be of broad interest to colleagues studying the relationship between domesticated species and their progenitors, as well as those studying instances of parallel evolution.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity