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  1. Differences in HIV-1 reservoir size, landscape characteristics and decay dynamics in acute and chronic treated HIV-1 Clade C infection

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Kavidha Reddy
    2. Guinevere Q. Lee
    3. Nicole Reddy
    4. Tatenda J.B. Chikowore
    5. Kathy Baisley
    6. Krista L. Dong
    7. Bruce D. Walker
    8. Xu G. Yu
    9. Mathias Lichterfeld
    10. Thumbi Ndung’u
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important, clearly written, and timely manuscript links the timing of ART with the kinetics of total and intact proviral HIV DNA. The conclusions are interesting and somewhat novel, and the importance of the work is high because the focus is on African women and clade C virus, both of which are understudied in the HIV reservoir field. The strength of the evidence is convincing though some definitions could be more precise and in some places the data could be reported slightly more clearly. Overall, this work will be of very high interest to scientists and clinicians in the HIV cure/persistence fields.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity
  2. Statistical learning shapes pain perception and prediction independently of external cues

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Jakub Onysk
    2. Nicholas Gregory
    3. Mia Whitefield
    4. Maeghal Jain
    5. Georgia Turner
    6. Ben Seymour
    7. Flavia Mancini
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents a valuable insight into a computational mechanism of pain perception. The evidence supporting the authors' claims is compelling. The work will be of interest to pain researchers working on computational models and cognitive mechanisms of pain in a Bayesian framework.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 9 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity
  3. Gender differences in submission behavior exacerbate publication disparities in elite journals

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Isabel Basson
    2. Chaoqun Ni
    3. Giovanna Badia
    4. Nathalie Tufenkji
    5. Cassidy R. Sugimoto
    6. Vincent LariviĂšre
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This convincing study, which is based on a survey of researchers, finds that women are less likely than men to submit articles to elite journals. It also finds that there is no relation between gender and reported desk rejection. The study is an important contribution to work on gender bias in the scientific literature.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity
  4. ChatGPT identifies gender disparities in scientific peer review

    This article has 1 author:
    1. Jeroen PH Verharen
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study used ChatGPT to assess certain linguistic characteristics (sentiment and politeness) of 500 peer reviews for 200 neuroscience papers published in Nature Communications. The vast majority of reviews were polite, but papers with female first authors received less polite reviews than papers with male first authors, whereas papers with a female senior author received more favourable reviews than papers with a male senior author. Overall, the study is an important contribution to work on gender bias, and the evidence for the potential utility of generative AI programs like ChatGPT in meta-research is solid.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 4 listsLatest version Latest activity
  5. High social status males experience accelerated epigenetic aging in wild baboons

    This article has 9 authors:
    1. Jordan A Anderson
    2. Rachel A Johnston
    3. Amanda J Lea
    4. Fernando A Campos
    5. Tawni N Voyles
    6. Mercy Y Akinyi
    7. Susan C Alberts
    8. Elizabeth A Archie
    9. Jenny Tung
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      Evaluation Summary:

      In this paper, the authors collect epigenomic data from a well-studied wild baboon community, which they use to construct an epigenetic clock, a method of measuring "biological age" that is increasingly used as a tool in human aging research. The authors find that deviations between biological and chronological age can in part be explained by social phenomena. In particular, for male baboons, maintaining social dominance may play an important role in accelerating the dimension of aging indexed by this measure. This is a foundational study for social-biological-health research.

      (This preprint has been reviewed by eLife. We include the public reviews from the reviewers here; the authors also receive private feedback with suggested changes to the manuscript. Reviewer #1 and Reviewer #2 agreed to share their names with the authors.)

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 4 listsLatest version Latest activity
  6. Epidemiology of Road Traffic Accidents and Injuries in Nigeria: A Protocol for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    This article has 16 authors:
    1. Samuel Osobuchi Ngene
    2. Olatoun Adefunke Adeola
    3. Chi-kadibia T Ukoma
    4. Augustine Nwakuche Duru
    5. Kayode Olaoluwa Olaniyan
    6. Chinemerem Eunice Onwuchekwa
    7. Chinonyelum Thecla Ezeonu
    8. Jonathan Chi Daboer
    9. Chioma Laura Odimegwu
    10. Peter Chika Iloanya
    11. Helen Chioma Okoye
    12. Richard Chinaza Ikeagwulonu
    13. Uzoma Vivian Asiegbu
    14. Amaka Obiageli Nnamani
    15. Ifeoma Joy Okoye
    16. Emmanuel Okechukwu Nna
    This article has no evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version
  7. Recommendations for accelerating open preprint peer review to improve the culture of science

    This article has 53 authors:
    1. Michele Avissar-Whiting
    2. Frédérique Belliard
    3. Stefano M. Bertozzi
    4. Amy Brand
    5. Katherine Brown
    6. Géraldine Clément-Stoneham
    7. Stephanie Dawson
    8. Gautam Dey
    9. Daniel Ecer
    10. Scott C. Edmunds
    11. Ashley Farley
    12. Tara D. Fischer
    13. Maryrose Franko
    14. James S. Fraser
    15. Kathryn Funk
    16. Clarisse Ganier
    17. Melissa Harrison
    18. Anna Hatch
    19. Haley Hazlett
    20. Samantha Hindle
    21. Daniel W. Hook
    22. Phil Hurst
    23. Sophien Kamoun
    24. Robert Kiley
    25. Michael M. Lacy
    26. Marcel LaFlamme
    27. Rebecca Lawrence
    28. Thomas Lemberger
    29. Maria Leptin
    30. Elliott Lumb
    31. Catriona J. MacCallum
    32. Christopher Steven Marcum
    33. Gabriele Marinello
    34. Alex Mendonça
    35. Sara Monaco
    36. Kleber Neves
    37. Damian Pattinson
    38. Jessica K. Polka
    39. Iratxe Puebla
    40. Martyn Rittman
    41. Stephen J. Royle
    42. Daniela Saderi
    43. Richard Sever
    44. Kathleen Shearer
    45. John E. Spiro
    46. Bodo Stern
    47. Dario Taraborelli
    48. Ron Vale
    49. Claudia G. Vasquez
    50. Ludo Waltman
    51. Fiona M. Watt
    52. Zara Y. Weinberg
    53. Mark Williams
    This article has no evaluationsAppears in 5 listsLatest version
  8. Modeling resource allocation strategies for insecticide-treated bed nets to achieve malaria eradication

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Nora Schmit
    2. Hillary M Topazian
    3. Matteo Pianella
    4. Giovanni D Charles
    5. Peter Winskill
    6. Michael T White
    7. Katharina Hauck
    8. Azra C Ghani
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents a valuable finding on the optimal prioritization in different malaria transmission settings for the distribution of insecticide-treated nets to reduce the malaria burden. The evidence supporting the claims of the authors is solid. The work will be of interest from a global funder perspective, though somewhat less relevant for individual countries.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity
  9. Persistence of intact HIV-1 proviruses in the brain during antiretroviral therapy

    This article has 9 authors:
    1. Weiwei Sun
    2. Yelizaveta Rassadkina
    3. Ce Gao
    4. Sarah Isabel Collens
    5. Xiaodong Lian
    6. Isaac H Solomon
    7. Shibani S Mukerji
    8. Xu G Yu
    9. Mathias Lichterfeld
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study uses near full-length HIV-1 sequencing to examine proviral persistence in various tissues derived from three individuals who received antiretroviral therapy until time of death. Intact as well as defective HIV-1 proviruses are found at various anatomical sites including the central nervous system; the results are convincing and relevant for our understanding of latent viral reservoirs, especially in the brain.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 7 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity
  10. Modulation of Neural Networks and Symptom Correlated in Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Double-blind Factorial Explanatory Clinical Trial of Home-Based Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    This article has 16 authors:
    1. Rael Lopes Alves
    2. Maxciel Zortea
    3. Paul Vicuña Serrano
    4. Vani dos Santos Laranjeira
    5. Betina Franceschini Tocchetto
    6. Leticia Ramalho
    7. Camila Fernanda da Silveira Alves
    8. Rafaela Brugnera Tomedi
    9. Rodrigo Pereira de Almeida
    10. Samara Machado Bruck
    11. Liciane Medeiros
    12. Paulo R. S. Sanches
    13. Danton P. Silva
    14. Iraci Lucena da Silva Torres
    15. Felipe Fregni
    16. Wolnei Caumo
    This article has no evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version