Showing page 4 of 22 pages of list content

  1. Independent regulation of Z-lines and M-lines during sarcomere assembly in cardiac myocytes revealed by the automatic image analysis software sarcApp

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Abigail C. Neininger-Castro
    2. James B. Hayes
    3. Zachary C. Sanchez
    4. Nilay Taneja
    5. Aidan M. Fenix
    6. Satish Moparthi
    7. St├ęphane Vassilopoulos
    8. Dylan T. Burnette
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This manuscript describes a useful tool for quantitative assessment of sarcomere structures in healthy and perturbed cardiomyocytes grown in vitro. The work is solid, and the methods, data and analyses broadly support the claims with only minor weaknesses. The tool will be relevant to biologists working on and interested in obtaining quantitative information on sarcomere structure, function and development.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 9 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  2. Impairment of lipid homoeostasis causes accumulation of protein aggregates in the lysosome

    This article has 9 authors:
    1. John Yong
    2. Jacqueline E. Villalta
    3. Ngoc Vu
    4. Matthew A. Kukurugya
    5. Bryson D. Bennett
    6. Magdalena Preciado L├│pez
    7. Julia R. Lazzari-Dean
    8. Kayley Hake
    9. Calvin H. Jan
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      Protein and lipid homeostasis are important for maintaining cellular functions but their crosstalk remains largely unknown. This important manuscript deals with this interesting topic and applies the powerful unbiased tools of somatic cell genetics to discover evidence suggesting a link between sphingolipids/cholesterol ester metabolism and lysosomal protein aggregation. However, in our view the experimental evidence in support of the paper's stated conclusions remains incomplete and measures that (i) go beyond reliance on the ProteoStat stain as the sole metric for aggregation and proteostatic challenge, (ii) biochemically back up the results and provide plausible mechanistic insights into the connection of lysosomal lipid handling and protein aggregation are needed.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  3. Two-way Dispatched function in Sonic hedgehog shedding and transfer to high-density lipoproteins

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. K. Ehring
    2. S.F. Ehlers
    3. J. Froese
    4. F. Gude
    5. J. Puschmann
    6. K. Grobe
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The authors present a useful analysis of different factors that are required for release of the lipid-linked morphogen Shh from cellular membranes. The evidence is currently still incomplete as experiments rely on over-expression of Shh in a single cell line and are sometimes of a correlative nature. The study confirms and extends previous findings and will be of interest to developmental biologists who work on Hedgehog signaling.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  4. A cleaved METTL3 potentiates the METTL3-WTAP interaction and breast cancer progression

    This article has 13 authors:
    1. Chaojun Yan
    2. Jingjing Xiong
    3. Zirui Zhou
    4. Qifang Li
    5. Chuan Gao
    6. Mengyao Zhang
    7. Liya Yu
    8. Jinpeng Li
    9. Ming-Ming Hu
    10. Chen-Song Zhang
    11. Cheguo Cai
    12. Haojian Zhang
    13. Jing Zhang
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents the valuable finding that a cleaved form of METTL3 (termed METTL3a) has an essential role in regulating the assembly of the METTL3-METTL14-WTAP complex. The evidence supporting the claims of the authors is solid, and the work will be of interest to medical biologists working on breast cancer.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  5. Mitochondrial electron transport chain, ceramide and Coenzyme Q are linked in a pathway that drives insulin resistance in skeletal muscle

    This article has 18 authors:
    1. Alexis Diaz-Vegas
    2. Soren Madsen
    3. Kristen C. Cooke
    4. Luke Carroll
    5. Jasmine X. Y. Khor
    6. Nigel Turner
    7. Xin Ying Lim
    8. Miro A. Astore
    9. Jonathan Morris
    10. Anthony Don
    11. Amanda Garfield
    12. Simona Zarini
    13. Karin A. Zemski Berry
    14. Andrew Ryan
    15. Bryan C. Bergman
    16. Joseph T. Brozinick
    17. David E. James
    18. James G. Burchfield
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study provides exciting first-time evidence linking palmitate-induced insulin resistance to ceramide accumulation within the mitochondrial compartment and subsequent depletion of CoQ, an essential component of mitochondrial respiration. Whereas the results and interpretations are generally solid, the mechanistic aspect of the work and conclusions put forth rely heavily on in vitro studies performed in cultured L6 myocytes, which are highly glycolytic and generally not viewed as a good model for studying muscle metabolism and insulin action. Nonetheless, the findings offer intriguing new insights into mechanisms that connect ceramides to both insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction, and are likely to open new avenues of preclinical/clinical research with broad therapeutic implications.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity
  6. Spindle assembly checkpoint-dependent mitotic delay is required for cell division in absence of centrosomes

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. KC Farrell
    2. Jennifer T. Wang
    3. Tim Stearns
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This work explores how centrosomes, which function as the primary microtubule organizing center in animal cells, regulate cell division by examining the process in cells in which centrosome formation has been inhibited. The carefully conducted experiments provide convincing support for the important observation that elongated, but successful, mitosis observed in cells lacking centrosomes is due to delays in cell cycle progression, though the reviewers highlight some caveats that merit further discussion.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  7. Differential translation of mRNA isoforms underlies oncogenic activation of cell cycle kinase Aurora A

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Roberta Cacioppo
    2. H. Begum Akman
    3. Taner Tuncer
    4. A. Elif Erson-Bensan
    5. Catherine Lindon
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      In this important study, the authors provide compelling evidence that the interplay between alternative polyadenylation (APA) of mRNA encoding Aurora Kinase A (AURKA) and hsa-let-7a miRNA governs AURKA protein levels. The authors show that short 3'UTR isoform of mRNA encoding AURKA is efficiently translated throughout the cell cycle, while the long 3'UTR isoform is suppressed by hsa-let-7a miRNA in a cell cycle-dependent manner. These findings delineate post-transcriptional mechanisms regulating AURKA expression that may be implicated in increase in AURKA protein that is frequently observed across a variety of cancers.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  8. Non-invasive Chromatin Deformation and Measurement of Differential Mechanical Properties in the Nucleus

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. B. Seelbinder
    2. M. Jain
    3. E. Erben
    4. S. Klykov
    5. I. D. Stoev
    6. M. Kreysing
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      Seelbinder et al. describe a new method for perturbing chromatin in living cells by local heating. Employing this approach, the authors uncover interesting behaviors that underscore the variability in the mechanical response of subnuclear domains and structures. The study is timely, and if some conceptual and technical aspects are improved, it should be of broad interest to both the cell biophysics and cell biology communities, in particular since the method can also be applied to study mechanical relationships of subcellular compartments in other cellular and multicellular systems.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  9. Global analysis of human-to-mouse contact-dependent intercellular mRNA and lncRNA transfer in cell culture

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Sandipan Dasgupta
    2. Daniella Y. Dayagi
    3. Gal Haimovich
    4. Emanuel Wyler
    5. Tsviya Olender
    6. Robert H. Singer
    7. Markus Landthaler
    8. Jeffrey E. Gerst
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The authors show that tunneling nanotubes or TNTs are used by cells to transfer full-length mRNAs. The data show that as much as 1% of the endogenous mRNA are passed between cells by this procedure. The transferred mRNA affect the transcriptome of the acceptor cells thus highlighting the significance of this nanotube mediated trafficking of mRNA between cells. We appreciate the difficulty of this exercise. The strength of the presented evidence could be questioned based on technical limitations.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  10. The ATM-E6AP-MASTL axis mediates DNA damage checkpoint recovery

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Yanqiu Li
    2. Feifei Wang
    3. Xin Li
    4. Ling Wang
    5. Zheng Yang
    6. Zhongsheng You
    7. Aimin Peng
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study reports the important finding that there appears to be a timer that monitors the repair of DNA after damage and regulates whether cells are subsequently able to enter mitosis. The authors identify proteins important for this decision and propose a mechanism supported by solid but not conclusive data. This study will be of interest to researchers in the fields of DNA damage repair and cell cycle control.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  11. Mitotic chromosomes scale to nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio and cell size in Xenopus

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Coral Y. Zhou
    2. Bastiaan Dekker
    3. Ziyuan Liu
    4. Hilda Cabrera
    5. Joel Ryan
    6. Job Dekker
    7. Rebecca Heald
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study combines experiments in developing embryos and embryo extracts to investigate a fundamental relationship in biology - how the size of mitotic chromosomes scales with changes in cell size during development. By combining the unique tools available in the Xenopus system with modern genomic approaches, the authors convincingly demonstrate that mitotic chromosome scaling is mediated by differential loading of maternal chromatin remodeling factors during interphase. Although it remains unclear exactly how these factors impact chromosome size, the findings reported here will be of broad interest to the cell biology community and are likely to spawn new avenues of experimental inquiry aimed at understanding intracellular scaling relationships.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  12. Myofibroblast Senescence Promotes Arrhythmogenic Remodeling in the Aged Infarcted Rabbit Heart

    This article has 19 authors:
    1. Brett C. Baggett
    2. Kevin R. Murphy
    3. Elif Sengun
    4. Eric Mi
    5. Yueming Cao
    6. Nilufer Turan
    7. Yichun Lu
    8. Lorraine Scofield
    9. Tae Yun Kim
    10. Anatoli Y. Kabakov
    11. Peter Bronk
    12. Zhilin Qu
    13. Patrizia Camelliti
    14. Patrycja Dubielecka
    15. Dmitry Terentyev
    16. Federica Del Monte
    17. Bum-Rak Choi
    18. John Sedivy
    19. Gideon Koren
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study describes important results and convincing evidence linking myofibroblast senescence in the aged heart with a pro-arrhythmogenic phenotype. This is in turn related to higher mortality after myocardial infarction in the aged rabbit heart. These constitute important empiric as opposed to detailed findings. They nevertheless will be of interest to clinician scientists studying cardiac function and disease.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  13. PTH regulates osteogenesis and suppresses adipogenesis through Zfp 467 in a feed-forward, cyclic AMP-dependent manner

    This article has 9 authors:
    1. Hanghang Liu
    2. Akane Wada
    3. Isabella Le
    4. Phuong T Le
    5. Andrew WF Lee
    6. Jun Zhou
    7. Francesca Gori
    8. Roland Baron
    9. Clifford J. Rosen
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The study provides evidence that the hormone PTH increases bone mass by, at least in part, regulating the factor Zfp467. In turn, Zfp67 controls expression of the receptor for PTH, thus creating a feedback loop that overall augments bone mass. The findings are novel and of potential great interest. Overall, the study is of interest to a broad audience and significant as it unveils a novel feedback loop involving PTH, a critical endocrine regulator of calcium, phosphate, and bone mass.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  14. Calaxin stabilizes the docking of outer arm dyneins onto ciliary doublet microtubule in vertebrates

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Hiroshi Yamaguchi
    2. Motohiro Morikawa
    3. Masahide Kikkawa
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      In vertebrates, ciliary motility is powered by axonemal dyneins, known as OADs, tethered to doublet microtubules by a pentameric docking complex including the Armc4 and Calaxin subunits. This valuable study combines zebrafish genetics with cryo-electron tomography to convincingly show that Armc4 plays a critical role in the docking of OAD and that Calaxin stabilizes the molecular interaction. The work will be of interest to those studying the structure and function of the axoneme, and motile cilia in general.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  15. Atf3 defines a population of pulmonary endothelial cells essential for lung regeneration

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Terren K. Niethamer
    2. Lillian I. Levin
    3. Michael P. Morley
    4. Apoorva Babu
    5. Su Zhou
    6. Edward E. Morrisey
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife Assessment

      The study has advanced our mechanistic understanding of lung regeneration. While the importance of regeneration of alveolar capillaries for long response to injury has been long recognized, the regulation of this process has not been well understood. Your study provides novel, comprehensive, and compelling evidence that the expression of the transcription factor Atf3 in alveolar capillary endothelial cells plays a critical role in the regeneration of alveolar capillaries following lung injury.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity
  16. Monoallelically-expressed Noncoding RNAs form nucleolar territories on NOR-containing chromosomes and regulate rRNA expression

    This article has 23 authors:
    1. Qinyu Hao
    2. Minxue Liu
    3. Swapna Vidhur Daulatabad
    4. Saba Gaffari
    5. Rajneesh Srivastava
    6. You Jin Song
    7. Shivang Bhaskar
    8. Anurupa Moitra
    9. Hazel Mangan
    10. Elizabeth Tseng
    11. Rachel B. Gilmore
    12. Susan M. Freier
    13. Xin Chen
    14. Chengliang Wang
    15. Sui Huang
    16. Stormy Chamberlain
    17. Hong Jin
    18. Jonas Korlach
    19. Brian McStay
    20. Saurabh Sinha
    21. Sarath Chandra Janga
    22. Supriya G. Prasanth
    23. Kannanganattu V. Prasanth
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study concerns an important area, that of monoallelic expression, but the study does not provide sufficient information about the candidate regulatory RNA to provide a significant advance over previous work, which should also be discussed in more detail.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  17. Identification of Paired-related Homeobox Protein 1 as a key mesenchymal transcription factor in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    This article has 23 authors:
    1. E. Marchal-Duval
    2. M. Homps-Legrand
    3. A. Froidure
    4. M. Jaillet
    5. M. Ghanem
    6. L. Deneuville
    7. A. Justet
    8. A. Maurac
    9. A. Vadel
    10. E. Fortas
    11. A. Cazes
    12. A. Joannes
    13. L. Giersch
    14. H. Mal
    15. P. Mordant
    16. C.M. Mounier
    17. K. Schirduan
    18. M. Korfei
    19. A. Gunther
    20. B. Mari
    21. F. Jaschinski
    22. B. Crestani
    23. A.A. Mailleux
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This manuscript will be of interest to scientists in the field of tissue injury and repair. It provides novel molecular mechanisms of a transcription factor, Prrx1, in fibroblast activation following lung injury. Overall, the work suggests that PRRX1 plays a functional role downstream of TGFb1 to elicit some aspects of the fibrotic response and that PRRX1 could represent an important therapeutic target to treat fibrosis. The strengths of this work are the multiple approaches applying human and mouse lung tissue used by the authors to test the role of PRRX1 in lung fibrosis, however, in its current form, major limitations need to be addressed.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  18. CRB3 navigates Rab11 trafficking vesicles to promote ╬│TuRC assembly during ciliogenesis

    This article has 14 authors:
    1. Bo Wang
    2. Zheyong Liang
    3. Tan tan
    4. Miao Zhang
    5. Yina Jiang
    6. Yangyang Shang
    7. Xiaoqian Gao
    8. Shaoran Song
    9. Ruiqi Wang
    10. He Chen
    11. Jie Liu
    12. Juan Li
    13. Yu Ren
    14. Peijun Liu
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This is a useful study for scientists interested in cell polarity, epithelial morphogenesis, cancer, and primary cilia. The authors investigate the role of CRB3 in regulating these processes by using a combination of a mammary epithelial cell-specific conditional Crb3 knockout mouse model, and cellular, molecular and biochemical approaches. The results, which are solid, supporting and extending previous findings, suggest that CRB3 affects ciliogenesis by a mechanism involving Rab11 and gamma-TuRC.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 10 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  19. Calcium transients trigger switch-like discharge of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) in an ERK-dependent manner

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Tetsuya Watabe
    2. Shinya Yamahira
    3. Kanako Takakura
    4. Dean Thumkeo
    5. Shuh Narumiya
    6. Michiyuki Matsuda
    7. Kenta Terai
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study reports investigation of the dynamics of PKA at the single-cell level in in vitro and in epithelia in vivo. Using different fluorescent biosensors and optogenetic actuators, the authors dissect the signaling pathway responsible for PKA waves, finding that PKA activation is a consequence of PGE2 release, which in turn is triggered by calcium pulses, requiring high ERK activity. The evidence supporting the claims is solid. At this stage the work is still partly descriptive in nature, and additional measurements would increase the strength of mechanistic insights and physiological relevance.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  20. Lipid homeostasis is essential for a maximal ER stress response

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Gilberto Garcia
    2. Hanlin Zhang
    3. Sophia Moreno
    4. C. Kimberly Tsui
    5. Brant Michael Webster
    6. Ryo Higuchi-Sanabria
    7. Andrew Dillin
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable study addresses the anticipated but poorly understood interconnections between ER proteostasis and lipid metabolism. The authors discovered key metabolic enzymes required for integration of ER stress and lipid synthesis and followed up with several direct experiments that provide solid evidence for a broad conservation of the described interactions.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity