1. Museomics of Carabus giant ground beetles shows an Oligocene origin and in situ Alpine diversification

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Marie T PAULI
    2. Jeremy GAUTHIER
    3. Marjorie LABEDAN
    4. Mickael BLANC
    5. Julia BILAT
    6. Emmanuel F.A. TOUSSAINT

    Reviewed by Peer Community In Zoology

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  2. Investments in photoreceptors compete with investments in optics to determine eye design

    This article has 2 authors:
    1. Francisco JH Heras
    2. Simon B Laughlin
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This paper makes a valuable contribution to our understanding of the tradeoffs in eye design - specifically between improvements in optics and in photoreceptor performance. The authors successfully build a formal theory that enables comparisons across a wide range of species and eye types. The conclusion from the modeling is that resources are split relatively evenly between optics and photoreceptors, and hence that both must be considered in eye design. Evidence for this conclusion is solid, and could be strengthened with a more complete comparison with the experiment.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  3. Unlocking the secrets of kangaroo locomotor energetics: Postural adaptations underpin increased tendon stress in hopping kangaroos

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Lauren H. Thornton
    2. Taylor J.M. Dick
    3. John R. Hutchinson
    4. Glen A. Lichtwark
    5. Craig P. McGowan
    6. Jonas Rubenson
    7. Alexis Wiktorowicz-Conroy
    8. Christofer J. Clemente
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable biomechanical analysis of kangaroo kinematics and kinetics across a range of hopping speeds and masses is a step towards understanding a long-standing problem in locomotion biomechanics: the mechanism for how, unlike other mammals, kangaroos are able to increase hopping speed without a concomitant increase in metabolic cost. Based on their suggestion that kangaroo posture changes with speed increase tendon stress/strain and hence elastic energy storage/return, the authors imply (but do not show quantitatively or qualitatively) that the greater tendon elastic energy storage/return counteracts the increased cost of generating muscular force at faster speeds and allows for the invariance in metabolic cost. The methods are impressive, but there is currently only limited evidence for increased tendon stress/strain at faster speeds, and the support for any conclusion metabolic energy expenditure is inadequate.

    Reviewed by eLife, preLights

    This article has 6 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  4. Bisphenol A affects the development and the onset of photosymbiosis in the acoel Symsagittifera roscoffensis

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. R. Pennati
    2. N. Cartelli
    3. C. Castelletti
    4. F. Ficetola
    5. X. Bailly
    6. S. Mercurio

    Reviewed by Arcadia Science

    This article has 2 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  5. How the liver contributes to stomach warming in the endothermic white shark Carcharodon carcharias

    This article has 2 authors:
    1. David C. Bernvi
    2. Geremy Cliff

    Reviewed by preLights

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  6. The value of livestock abortion surveillance in Tanzania: identifying disease priorities and informing interventions

    This article has 15 authors:
    1. Felix Lankester
    2. Tito J Kibona
    3. Kathryn J Allan
    4. William de Glanville
    5. Joram J Buza
    6. Frank Katzer
    7. Jo E Halliday
    8. Blandina T Mmbaga
    9. Nick Wheelhouse
    10. Elisabeth A Innes
    11. Kate Thomas
    12. Obed M Nyasebwa
    13. Emanuel Swai
    14. John R Claxton
    15. Sarah Cleaveland
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study reports the use of a surveillance approach in identifying emerging diseases, monitoring disease trends, and informing evidence-based interventions in the control and prevention of livestock abortions, as it relates to their public health implications. The data support the convincing finding that abortion incidence is higher during the dry season, and occurs more in cross-bred and exotic livestock breeds. Aetiological and epidemiological data can be generated through established protocols for sample collection and laboratory diagnosis. These findings are of potential interest to the fields of veterinary medicine, public health, and epidemiology.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  7. A comparison of the parasitoid wasp species richness of tropical forest sites in Peru and Uganda – subfamily Rhyssinae (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae)

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Tapani Hopkins
    2. Hanna Tuomisto
    3. Isrrael C. Gómez
    4. Ilari E. Sääksjärvi

    Reviewed by Peer Community In Zoology

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  8. Species composition and distribution of the Anopheles gambiae complex circulating in Kinshasa

    This article has 11 authors:
    1. Josue Zanga
    2. Emery Metelo
    3. Nono Mvuama
    4. Victoire Nsabatien
    5. Vanessa Mvudi
    6. Degani Banzulu
    7. Osée Mansiangi
    8. Maxwel Bamba
    9. Narcisse Basosila
    10. Rodrigue Agossa
    11. Roger Wumba
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by GigaByte

      Editors Assessment: Understanding the distribution of Anopheles mosquito species is essential for planning and implementing malaria control programmes, a task undertaken in this study that assesses the composition and distribution of the Anopheles in different districts of Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Mosquitoes were collected using CDC light traps, and then identified by morphological and molecular means. In total 3,839 Anopheles were collected, and data was digitised, validated and shared via the GBIF database under a CC0 waiver. The project monitoring the monthly dynamics of four species of Anopheles, showing a fluctuation in their respective frequencies during the study period. Review improved the metadata by adding more accurate date information, and this data can provide important information for further basic and advanced studies on the ecology and phenology of these vectors in West Africa.

      *This evaluation refers to version 1 of the preprint

    Reviewed by GigaByte

    This article has 2 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  9. Energy conservation by collective movement in schooling fish

    This article has 2 authors:
    1. Yangfan Zhang
    2. George V Lauder
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The authors provide an important series of metabolic measurements characterizing group dynamics in fish, rationalizing that schooling behavior presents several benefits. The strength of evidence supporting this conclusion is solid, but the specific methodological and analytical approaches taken should be considered for further interpretation.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  10. Imidacloprid disrupts larval molting regulation and nutrient energy metabolism, causing developmental delay in honey bee Apis mellifera

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Zhi Li
    2. Yuedi Wang
    3. Qiqian Qin
    4. Lanchun Chen
    5. Xiaoqun Dang
    6. Zhengang Ma
    7. Zeyang Zhou
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This investigation of the changes in gene expression and some of the physiological consequences of sublethal exposures to the neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid in honeybee larvae is useful, although numerous experiments were not considered based on technical issues. The methodological design leads to concerns and it is therefore not obvious that all conclusions are justified. The study adds to our understanding of how this insecticide impacts development and growth of honeybees, but the evidence supporting the major claims is incomplete.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 9 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity