1. Habitat fragmentation mediates the mechanisms underlying long-term climate-driven thermophilization in birds

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Juan Liu
    2. Morgan W Tingley
    3. Qiang Wu
    4. Peng Ren
    5. Tinghao Jin
    6. Ping Ding
    7. Xingfeng Si
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study enhances our understanding of how habitat fragmentation and climate change jointly influence bird community thermophilization in a fragmented island system. The evidence supporting some conclusions is incomplete, as while the overall trends are convincing, some methodological aspects, particularly the isolation metrics and interpretation of colonization/extinction rates, require further clarification. This work will be of broad interest to ecologists and conservation biologists, providing crucial insights into how ecosystems and communities react to climate change.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  2. Deciphering deep-sea chemosynthetic symbiosis by single-nucleus RNA-sequencing

    This article has 14 authors:
    1. Hao Wang
    2. Kai He
    3. Huan Zhang
    4. Quanyong Zhang
    5. Lei Cao
    6. Jing Li
    7. Zhaoshan Zhong
    8. Hao Chen
    9. Li Zhou
    10. Chao Lian
    11. Minxiao Wang
    12. Kai Chen
    13. Pei-Yuan Qian
    14. Chaolun Li
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study provides an important cell type atlas of the gill of the mussel Gigantidas platifrons using a single nucleus RNA-seq dataset, a resource for the community of scientists studying deep sea physiology and metabolism and intracellular host-symbiont relationships. The evidence supporting the conclusions is convincing with high-quality single-nucleus RNA sequencing and transplant experiments. This work will be of broad relevance for scientists interested in host-symbiont relationships across ecosystems.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 14 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  3. Accounting for observation biases associated with counts of young when estimating fecundity: case study on the arboreal-nesting red kite (Milvus milvus)

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Rahel Sollmann
    2. Nathalie Adenot
    3. Peter Spakovszky
    4. Jendrik Windt
    5. Brady J. Mattsson

    Reviewed by Peer Community in Ecology

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  4. Partitioning changes in ecosystem productivity by effects of species interactions in biodiversity experiments

    This article has 9 authors:
    1. Jing Tao
    2. Charles A. Nock
    3. Eric B. Searle
    4. Shongming Huang
    5. Rongzhou Man
    6. Hua Yang
    7. Grégoire T. Freschet
    8. Cyrille Violle
    9. Ji Zheng
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This work proposes that positive biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships found in experiments have been exaggerated because commonly used statistical analyses are flawed. As an alternative, the authors suggest a new analysis based on species competitive responses. Unfortunately, the presented methods are not reproducibly described, not yet complete, and inadequate for hypothesis testing. The reviewers agreed that the authors have either misinterpreted or chosen not to take into account much of the current research literature in the field of plant competition and biodiversity research.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  5. Combining radio-telemetry and radar measurements to test optimal foraging in an aerial insectivore bird

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Itai Bloch
    2. David Troupin
    3. Sivan Toledo
    4. Ran Nathan
    5. Nir Sapir
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable work advances our understanding of the foraging behaviour of aerial insectivorous birds. Its major strength is the large volume of tracking data and the accuracy of those data. However, the evidence supporting the main claim of optimal foraging is incomplete.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  6. Human disturbance increases spatiotemporal associations among mountain forest terrestrial mammal species

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Xueyou Li
    2. William V Bleisch
    3. Wenqiang Hu
    4. Quan Li
    5. Hongjiao Wang
    6. Zhongzheng Chen
    7. Ru Bai
    8. Xue-Long Jiang
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      In this study, camera trapping and species distribution models are used to show that human disturbance in mountain forests in the eastern Himalayas pushes medium-sized and large mammal species into narrower habitat space, thus increasing their co-occurrence. While the collected data provide a useful basis for further work, the study presents incomplete evidence to support the claim that increased co-occurrence may indicate positive interactions between species.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  7. Spider mites collectively avoid plants with cadmium irrespective of their frequency or the presence of competitors

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Diogo Prino Godinho
    2. Inês Fragata
    3. Maud Charlery de la Masseliere
    4. Sara Magalhães

    Reviewed by Peer Community in Ecology

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  8. Neuropeptide Bursicon and its receptor mediated the transition from summer-form to winter-form of Cacopsylla chinensis

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Zhixian Zhang
    2. Jianying Li
    3. Yilin Wang
    4. Zhen Li
    5. Xiaoxia Liu
    6. Songdou Zhang
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The authors report that the neurohormone, bursicon, and its receptor, play a role in regulating aspects of the seasonal polyphenism of the bug, Cacopsylla chinensis. This important study shows that low temperature activates the bursicon signaling pathway during the transition from the summer to the winter form and that it affects cuticle pigment and chitin content, and cuticle thickness. In addition, the authors show that the microRNA miR-6012 targets the bursicon receptor, thereby modulating the function of the bursicon signaling pathway. The study's solid set of experiments and results reveal a role of bursicon signaling in regulating features of polyphenism related to the exoskeleton. Nevertheless, they only incompletely substantiate the authors' claims about the regulation of polyphenism itself.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 2 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  9. Hierarchizing multi-scale environmental effects on agricultural pest population dynamics: a case study on the annual onset of Bactrocera dorsalis population growth in Senegalese orchards

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Cécile Caumette
    2. Paterne Diatta
    3. Sylvain Piry
    4. Marie-Pierre Chapuis
    5. Emile Faye
    6. Fabio Sigrist
    7. Olivier Martin
    8. Julien Papaïx
    9. Thierry Brévault
    10. Karine Berthier

    Reviewed by Peer Community in Ecology

    This article has 1 evaluationAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  10. Adipokinetic hormone signaling mediates the enhanced fecundity of Diaphorina citri infected by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Jiayun Li
    2. Paul Holford
    3. George Andrew Charles Beattie
    4. Shujie Wu
    5. Jielan He
    6. Shijian Tan
    7. Desen Wang
    8. Yurong He
    9. Yijing Cen
    10. Xiaoge Nian
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study reveals the molecular basis of mutualism between a vector insect and a bacterium responsible for the most devastating disease in citrus agriculture worldwide. The evidence supporting the conclusions is compelling, with solid biochemical and gene expression analyses demonstrating the phenomenon. We believe this work will be of great interest to the fields of vector-borne disease control and host-pathogen interaction.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 7 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity