1. Fine-scale tracking reveals visual field use for predator detection and escape in collective foraging of pigeon flocks

    This article has 2 authors:
    1. Mathilde Delacoux
    2. Fumihiro Kano
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      In this fundamental study, the authors use innovative fine-scale motion capture technologies to study visual vigilance with high-acuity vision, to estimate the visual fixation of free-feeding pigeons. The authors present compelling evidence for use of the fovea to inspect predator cues, the behavioral state influencing the latency for fovea use, and the use of the fovea decreasing the latency to escape of both the focal individual and other flock members. The work will be of broad interest to behavioral ecologists.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  2. Diverse prey capture strategies in teleost larvae

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Duncan S Mearns
    2. Sydney A Hunt
    3. Martin W Schneider
    4. Ash V Parker
    5. Manuel Stemmer
    6. Herwig Baier
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important body of work uses state-of-the-art quantitative methods to characterize and compare behaviors across five different fish species to understand which features are conserved and which ones are differentiated. The results from this study will potentially be of interest to ethologists and also have potential utility in understanding the neural mechanisms leading to these behaviors. While some claims are supported with compelling evidence, there are a few results that need further justification or qualification.

    Reviewed by eLife, Arcadia Science

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  3. Landing force reveals new form of motion-induced sound camouflage in a wild predator

    This article has 9 authors:
    1. Kim Schalcher
    2. Estelle Milliet
    3. Robin Séchaud
    4. Roman Bühler
    5. Bettina Almasi
    6. Simon Potier
    7. Paolo Becciu
    8. Alexandre Roulin
    9. Emily LC Shepard
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This fundamental work substantially advances our understanding of animals' foraging behaviour by monitoring the movement and body posture of barn owls in high resolution and assessing their foraging success. With a large dataset, the evidence supporting the main conclusions is compelling. This work provides new corroboration for motion-induced sound camouflage and has broad implications for understanding predator-prey interactions.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 6 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  4. Developmental stage shapes the realized energy landscape for a flight specialist

    This article has 14 authors:
    1. Elham Nourani
    2. Louise Faure
    3. Hester Brønnvik
    4. Martina Scacco
    5. Enrico Bassi
    6. Wolfgang Fiedler
    7. Martin U. Grüebler
    8. Julia S. Hatzl
    9. David Jenny
    10. Andrea Roverselli
    11. Petra Sumasgutner
    12. Matthias Tschumi
    13. Martin Wikelski
    14. Kamran Safi
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study substantially advances our understanding of energy landscapes and their link to animal ontogeny. The evidence supporting the conclusions is compelling, with high-throughput telemetry data and advanced track segmentation methods used to develop and map energy landscapes. The work will be of broad interest to animal ecologists.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  5. Prediction error determines how memories are organized in the brain

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Nicholas GW Kennedy
    2. Jessica C Lee
    3. Simon Killcross
    4. R Fred Westbrook
    5. Nathan M Holmes
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This is a fundamental study examining the role of prediction error in state allocation of memories. The data provided are convincing and largely support the conclusion that a gradual change between acquisition and extinction maintains the memory state of acquisition and thus results in extinction that is resistant to restoration. This paper is of interest to behavioural and neuroscience researchers studying learning, memory, and the neural mechanisms of those processes as well as to clinicians using extinction-based therapies in treating anxiety-based disorders

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 9 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  6. Presynaptic Rac1 in the hippocampus selectively regulates working memory

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Jaebin Kim
    2. Edwin Bustamante
    3. Peter Sotonyi
    4. Nicholas D. Maxwell
    5. Pooja Parameswaran
    6. Julie K. Kent
    7. William C. Wetsel
    8. Erik J. Soderblom
    9. Bence Rácz
    10. Scott H. Soderling
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The paper characterized a specific defect in the spatial working memory of mice with a deficit in a protein called Rac1. Rac1 inhibition was limited to the presynaptic compartment of neurons, which is significant because past work has inhibited both pre- and postsynaptic compartments. The study also identified potential effectors of Rac1. The work is important for these reasons, and the strength of the evidence is exceptional.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  7. Mechanism of barotaxis in marine zooplankton

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Luis Alberto Bezares Calderón
    2. Réza Shahidi
    3. Gáspár Jékely
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This fundamental study addresses the question of how certain zooplankton achieve barotaxis, directed locomotion in response to changes in hydraulic pressure. The authors provide compelling evidence that the response involves ciliary photoreceptors interacting with motoneurons. This work should be of broad interest to scientists working on mechanosensation, cilia, locomotion, and photoreceptors.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 6 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  8. Stochastic characterization of navigation strategies in an automated variant of the Barnes maze

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Ju-Young Lee
    2. Dahee Jung
    3. Sebastien Royer
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents a valuable new behavioral apparatus aimed at differentiating the strategies animals use to orient themselves in an environment. The evidence supporting the claims is solid, with statistical modeling of animal behavior. Overall, this study will attract the interest of researchers exploring spatial learning and memory.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 14 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  9. Polarised Moonlight Guides Nocturnal Bull Ants Home

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Cody A Freas
    2. Ajay Narendra
    3. Trevor Murray
    4. Ken Cheng
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important work substantially advances our understanding of nocturnal animal navigation and the ways that animals use polarized light. The evidence supporting the conclusions is convincing, with elegant behavioural experiments in actively navigating ants. The work will be of interest to biologists working on animal navigation or sensory ecology.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity
  10. Why the brown ghost chirps at night

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Livio Oboti
    2. Federico Pedraja
    3. Marie Ritter
    4. Marlena Lohse
    5. Lennart Klette
    6. Rüdiger Krahe
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This is a valuable contribution to the electric fish community, and to studies of active sensing, in that it provides evidence that a well-studied behavior (chirping) may serve in active sensing rather than communication. This is likely to stimulate follow-up behavioral and physiological studies to determine whether the active sensing component of the behavior is pre-eminent, or whether their major function is communication. For the most part, the evidence for increased chirping in more cluttered environments and the relationship between chirping and movement are convincing. However, the evidence used to argue that chirping does not vary with behavioral context is less so, and the arguments against a communicative function of chirps are not strong. The main conclusions are only supported by correlations and remain for now at the level of an interesting hypothesis to explore.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 9 evaluationsAppears in 1 listLatest version Latest activity