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  1. Review 2: "The Unequal Burden of the Covid-19 Pandemic: Racial/Ethnic Disparities in US Cause-Specific Mortality"

    This preprint contributes new evidence that Black and Hispanic populations share the greatest burden of COVID-19 pandemic. Reviewers found main claims to be strong and potentially informative. There are important implications for policy and practice.

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  2. Review 1: "The Unequal Burden of the Covid-19 Pandemic: Racial/Ethnic Disparities in US Cause-Specific Mortality"

    This preprint contributes new evidence that Black and Hispanic populations share the greatest burden of COVID-19 pandemic. Reviewers found main claims to be strong and potentially informative. There are important implications for policy and practice.

    Read the original source
    Was this evaluation helpful?
  3. Reviews of: "The Unequal Burden of the Covid-19 Pandemic: Racial/Ethnic Disparities in US Cause-Specific Mortality"

    Reviewers: L Golestaneh (Albert Einstein College of Medicine) | 📘📘📘📘📘 • S Adhikari (NYU Langone Health) + N Pantaleo (Albert Einstein College of Medicine) | 📒📒📒◻️◻️

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  4. SciScore for 10.1101/2021.08.25.21262636: (What is this?)

    Please note, not all rigor criteria are appropriate for all manuscripts.

    Table 1: Rigor

    Ethicsnot detected.
    Sex as a biological variablenot detected.
    Randomizationnot detected.
    Blindingnot detected.
    Power Analysisnot detected.

    Table 2: Resources

    No key resources detected.


    Results from OddPub: We did not detect open data. We also did not detect open code. Researchers are encouraged to share open data when possible (see Nature blog).


    Results from LimitationRecognizer: We detected the following sentences addressing limitations in the study:
    Limitations: Deaths included in this analysis were available from the National Center for Health Statistics through August 3, 2021. It is possible that delays in registration will result in additional deaths being reported for 2020. Such delays are especially likely for external causes of death for which certification often involves multiple authorities. At the time of this writing, available data do not allow detailed external causes of death to be disaggregated simultaneously by age and racial/ethnic group. As noted above in our sensitivity analysis, alternative methods of estimating what mortality would have been in 2020 in the absence of the Covid-19 pandemic would produce different estimates of the effect of the pandemic on mortality. In addition to the choice of modeling strategy, estimates may also be affected by the length of the time horizon used and the granularity of the time unit on the death series (Nepomuceno et al., 2021). In the present study, results were not sensitive to the use of a linear modeling approach based on an extended time series, which may at least partially reflect our use of age standardization to account for changes in the population age structure. Uncertainties are likely greatest for external causes of death because deaths from drug overdose were already increasing rapidly in 2019 so that some of the growth in this category in 2020 may be a result of preexisting trends (Glei, 2021). Our study, based on data released by the National Center fo...

    Results from TrialIdentifier: No clinical trial numbers were referenced.


    Results from Barzooka: We did not find any issues relating to the usage of bar graphs.


    Results from JetFighter: We did not find any issues relating to colormaps.


    Results from rtransparent:
    • Thank you for including a conflict of interest statement. Authors are encouraged to include this statement when submitting to a journal.
    • Thank you for including a funding statement. Authors are encouraged to include this statement when submitting to a journal.
    • No protocol registration statement was detected.

    Results from scite Reference Check: We found no unreliable references.


    About SciScore

    SciScore is an automated tool that is designed to assist expert reviewers by finding and presenting formulaic information scattered throughout a paper in a standard, easy to digest format. SciScore checks for the presence and correctness of RRIDs (research resource identifiers), and for rigor criteria such as sex and investigator blinding. For details on the theoretical underpinning of rigor criteria and the tools shown here, including references cited, please follow this link.

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