Showing page 3 of 25 pages of list content

  1. Exonuclease Xrn1 regulates TORC1 signaling in response to SAM availability

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Madeline M. McGinnis
    2. Benjamin M. Sutter
    3. Samira Jahangiri
    4. Benjamin P. Tu
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) presents important findings demonstrating that the exonuclease Xrn1 regulates autophagy in response to methionine deprivation through effects on TORC1. There is solid evidence that the impact of Xrn1 on TORC1 is contingent on its catalytic activity rather than the degradation of any specific category of mRNAs. A major strength is the novel mechanism, in which Xrn1 modulates the nucleotide-binding state of the Gtr1/2 complex.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  2. Effect of alpha-tubulin acetylation on the doublet microtubule structure

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Shun Kai Yang
    2. Shintaroh Kubo
    3. Corbin Black
    4. Katya Peri
    5. Daniel Dai
    6. Melissa Valente
    7. Jacek Gaertig
    8. Khanh Huy Bui
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      In their fundamental study, the authors employ a combination of cryo-electron microscopy, molecular dynamics, and mass spectrometry to elucidate the impact of α-tubulin acetylation at the lumenal lysine 40 residue (αK40) on the structure and stability of doublet microtubules in cilia. While the work provides compelling evidence for the role of αK40 acetylation in the cilium, the current version could benefit from additional statistical analyses and clarification of its conclusions regarding the effects of acetylation on microtubule inner proteins (MIPs).

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    This article has 2 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  3. The exocyst complex controls multiple events in the pathway of regulated exocytosis

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Sofía Suárez Freire
    2. Sebastián Pérez-Pandolfo
    3. Sabrina M. Fresco
    4. Pablo Wappner
    5. Mariana Melani
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study makes a valuable contribution by characterizing the role of the exocyst in secretory granule exocytosis in the Drosophila larval salivary gland. The results lead to the novel interpretation that the exocyst participates not only in exocytosis, but also in earlier steps of secretory granule biogenesis and maturation. Although these ideas are potentially of interest to a wide range of membrane traffic researchers, the evidence is incomplete, and the authors are urged to consider the possibility that inactivation of an essential exocytosis component might have indirect effects on other parts of the secretory pathway.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  4. Senescence of endplate osteoclasts induces sensory innervation and spinal pain

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Dayu Pan
    2. Kheiria Gamal Benkato
    3. Xuequan Han
    4. Jinjian Zheng
    5. Vijay Kumar
    6. Mei Wan
    7. Junying Zheng
    8. Xu Cao
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This fundamental work by Cao et al. advances our understanding of the role of senescent osteoclasts (SnOCs) in the pathogenesis of spine instability. The authors provide compelling evidence for the SnOCs to induce sensory nerve innervation. Subsequently, reduction of SnOCs by the senolytic drug Navitoclax markedly reduces spinal pain sensitivity. This work will be of broad interest to regenerative biologists working on spinal pain.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  5. Genetic screen identified PRMT5 as a neuroprotection target against cerebral ischemia

    This article has 9 authors:
    1. Haoyang Wu
    2. Peiyuan Lv
    3. Jinyu Wang
    4. Brian Bennett
    5. Jiajia Wang
    6. Pishun Li
    7. Yi Peng
    8. Guang Hu
    9. Jiaji Lin
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The authors performed a useful RNAi screen to identify epigenetic regulators involved in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal injury. PRMT5 was identified as a negative regulator of neuronal cell survival after OGD. Solid in vitro and in vivo data suggest that PRMT5 could be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  6. Neural network emulation of the human ventricular cardiomyocyte action potential: a tool for more efficient computation in pharmacological studies

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Thomas Grandits
    2. Christoph M. Augustin
    3. Gundolf Haase
    4. Norbert Jost
    5. Gary R. Mirams
    6. Steven A. Niederer
    7. Gernot Plank
    8. András Varró
    9. László Virág
    10. Alexander Jung
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable prospective study develops a new tool to accelerate pharmacological studies by using neural networks to emulate the human ventricular cardiomyocyte action potential. The evidence supporting the conclusions is convincing, based on using a large and high-quality dataset to train the neural network emulator. There are nevertheless a few areas in which the article may be improved through validating the neural network emulators against extensive experimental data. In addition, the article may be improved through delineating the exact speed-up achieved and the scope for acceleration. The work will be of broad interest to scientists working in cardiac simulation and quantitative system pharmacology.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  7. Ex vivo Expansion Potential of Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells: A Rare Property Only Partially Predicted by Phenotype

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Qinyu Zhang
    2. Rasmus Olofzon
    3. Anna Konturek-Ciesla
    4. Ouyang Yuan
    5. David Bryder
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents a valuable dissection on how functional HSCs are expanded in PVA cultures. The functional and multi-omic analyses provided are convincing, although the additional data and their analysis provided during revision could have been included in the test to assist readers and to strengthen the published manuscript. Nevertheless, the present work will be of value for stem cell biologists interested in HSC regulation.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 7 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  8. Apoptosis recognition receptors regulate skin tissue repair in mice

    This article has 14 authors:
    1. Olivia Justynski
    2. Kate Bridges
    3. Will Krause
    4. Maria Fernanda Forni
    5. Quan M Phan
    6. Teresa Sandoval-Schaefer
    7. Kristyn Carter
    8. Diane E King
    9. Henry C Hsia
    10. Michael I Gazes
    11. Steven D Vyce
    12. Ryan R Driskell
    13. Kathryn Miller-Jensen
    14. Valerie Horsley
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The authors studied the mechanisms by which dead cells are removed from the wounded skin in a process called efferocytosis. By analyzing different cell populations in the skin, the authors find that proteins involved in mediating the cell death and marking the cells as undergoing this process are elevated during distinct times in the wound healing program. Interestingly, these same proteins are elevated even higher in diabetic wounds. Finally the authors demonstrate that blocking the process of efferocytosis alters the wound healing program, thus illustrating its importance in effective wound repair.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  9. Distinct transcriptomic profile of satellite cells contributes to preservation of neuromuscular junctions in extraocular muscles of ALS mice

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Ang Li
    2. Jianxun Yi
    3. Xuejun Li
    4. Li Dong
    5. Lyle W. Ostrow
    6. Jianjie Ma
    7. Jingsong Zhou
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This manuscript describes valuable information on how the extraocular muscles (EOM) are preserved in a mouse model of familial Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) that carries a G93A mutation in the Sod1 gene. The authors provide convincing evidence of how the integrity of neuromuscular junction is preserved in EOM but not in limb and diaphragm muscles of G93A mice. Overall, this interesting work provides new evidence regarding the etiopathogenesis of ALS and insights for the development of therapeutic targets to slow the loss of neuromuscular function in ALS.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity
  10. Endogenous tagging using split mNeonGreen in human iPSCs for live imaging studies

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Mathieu C. Husser
    2. Nhat P. Pham
    3. Chris Law
    4. Flavia R. B. Araujo
    5. Vincent J.J. Martin
    6. Alisa Piekny
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      In this study, the authors develop a useful strategy for fluorophore-tagging endogenous proteins in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using a split mNeonGreen approach. Experimentally, the methods are solid, and the data presented support the author's conclusions. Overall, these methodologies should be useful to a wide audience of cell biologists who want to study protein localization and dynamics at endogenous levels in iPSCs.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  11. Rab7 dependent regulation of goblet cell protein CLCA1 modulates gastrointestinal homeostasis

    This article has 15 authors:
    1. Preksha Gaur
    2. Yesheswini Rajendran
    3. Bhagyashree Srivastava
    4. Manasvini Markandey
    5. Vered Fishbain-Yoskovitz
    6. Gayatree Mohapatra
    7. Aamir Suhail
    8. Shikha Chaudhary
    9. Shaifali Tyagi
    10. Subhash C Yadav
    11. Amit K Pandey
    12. Yifat Merbl
    13. Avinash Bajaj
    14. Vineet Ahuja
    15. Chittur V Srikanth
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This is an important study for understanding the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. It convincingly demonstrates reduced levels of the vesicular trafficking protein Rab7 in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, leading to altered levels of calcium-activated chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1) and subsequent mucin dysregulation, highlighting Rab7's significance in gut homeostasis maintenance. The manuscript advances the field as it provides insights into a novel regulatory pathway implicated in ulcerative colitis, potentially paving the way for the development of targeted therapeutic interventions.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  12. Human receptive endometrial organoid for deciphering the implantation window

    This article has 15 authors:
    1. Yu Zhang
    2. Rusong Zhao
    3. Chaoyan Yang
    4. Jinzhu Song
    5. Peishu Liu
    6. Yan Li
    7. Boyang Liu
    8. Tao Li
    9. Changjian Yin
    10. Minghui Lu
    11. Zhenzhen Hou
    12. Chuanxin Zhang
    13. Zi-Jiang Chen
    14. Keliang Wu
    15. Han Zhao
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents initial findings in the generation of 3D cell constructs from endometrial cell mixtures seeded in Matrigel scaffold and treated with hormones as a proof of concept. While the study findings are valuable, functional validation to demonstrate its robustness is lacking, and therefore the strength of evidence is incomplete. The term organoids might not be appropriate to describe this in vitro model.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  13. Early recovery of proteasome activity in cells pulse-treated with proteasome inhibitors is independent of DDI2

    This article has 2 authors:
    1. Ibtisam Ibtisam
    2. Alexei F. Kisselev
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents important findings on a transcription-independent component of the early recovery of proteasome activity from a short pulse of proteasome inhibitor treatment. While the evidence supporting this conclusion is solid, experimental support forthe proposal of an alternative regulatory process operative at the level of proteasome assembly, is incomplete. Lacking is experimental quantification of the effect of proteasome inhibition on the rate at which newly synthesized subunits are assembled into proteasomes.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  14. Post-transcriptional splicing can occur in a slow-moving zone around the gene

    This article has 18 authors:
    1. Allison Coté
    2. Aoife O’Farrell
    3. Ian Dardani
    4. Margaret Dunagin
    5. Chris Coté
    6. Yihan Wan
    7. Sareh Bayatpour
    8. Heather L. Drexler
    9. Katherine A. Alexander
    10. Fei Chen
    11. Asmamaw T. Wassie
    12. Rohan Patel
    13. Kenneth Pham
    14. Edward S. Boyden
    15. Shelley Berger
    16. Jennifer Phillips-Cremins
    17. L. Stirling Churchman
    18. Arjun Raj
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This fundamental study addresses a long-standing mystery in splicing regulation: does splicing occur co- or post-transcriptionally? The authors provide compelling evidence demonstrating that splicing can occur post-transcriptionally at a transcription site proximal zone, changing the way we think about splicing.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 7 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  15. Articular cartilage corefucosylation regulates tissue resilience in osteoarthritis

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Kentaro Homan
    2. Tomohiro Onodera
    3. Hisatoshi Hanamatsu
    4. Jun-ichi Furukawa
    5. Daisuke Momma
    6. Masatake Matsuoka
    7. Norimasa Iwasaki
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable study sheds light on the pivotal role of alterations in chondrocyte glycan metabolism in two contexts: The onset of cartilage degeneration and early onset of osteoarthritis (OA). The action is through hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes, a finding that provides insights into the identification of nascent markers for early-stage OA. The evidence supporting the claims is solid, with the authors clearly demonstrating the role of articular cartilage corefucosylation in the development of OA. The authors' inferences would be further enhanced through future experiments aimed at analyzing the mechanisms underlying the changes in glycometabolism in cartilage.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  16. Topological stress triggers difficult-to-repair DNA lesions in ribosomal DNA with ensuing formation of PML-nucleolar compartment

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Terezie Hornofova
    2. Alexandra Urbancokova
    3. Josef Novak
    4. Sarka Salajkova
    5. Sona Stemberkova Hubackova
    6. Alena Uvizl
    7. Brian McStay
    8. Zdenek Hodny
    9. Jiri Bartek
    10. Pavla Vasicova
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This useful work provides insight into the formation of associations between the nucleolus and Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs). The work showed that these associations depend on both the formation of DNA double-strand breaks and the impaired RNA Polymerase I transcription, and also is modulated by the homologous recombination. The evidence supporting the claims is incomplete and the paper needs more experimental support on the dynamics of the association and mechanistic insight into the signaling for its formation.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  17. Sorting of secretory proteins at the trans-Golgi network by human TGN46

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Pablo Lujan
    2. Carla Garcia-Cabau
    3. Yuichi Wakana
    4. Javier Vera Lillo
    5. Carmen Rodilla-RamĂ­rez
    6. Hideaki Sugiura
    7. Vivek Malhotra
    8. Xavier Salvatella
    9. Maria F. Garcia-Parajo
    10. Felix Campelo
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study provides the fundamental insight that TGN46, a single-pass membrane protein, acts as a cargo receptor for proteins at the Trans-Golgi Network. The authors demonstrate that the luminal domain of TGN46 is crucial for the incorporation of the soluble secretory protein PAUF into CARTS, a class of vesicles mediating TGN to surface traffic. The data presented are compelling, yielding a clear model for the sorting of cargos destined for secretion.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  18. ARHGAP18-ezrin functions as an autoregulatory module for RhoA in the assembly of distinct actin-based structures

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Andrew T Lombardo
    2. Cameron AR Mitchell
    3. Riasat Zaman
    4. David J McDermitt
    5. Anthony Bretscher
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This fundamental work substantially advances our understanding of how cells can tightly modulate small GTPase activity to build and maintain neighboring cytoskeletal structures, in this case microvilli. The evidence supporting these claims is compelling and is supported by both protein-protein interaction assays as well as cell biological studies. The work will be of interest to cell biologist studying the cytoskeleton as well as those interested in G-protein mediated regulation.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 2 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  19. Mecp2 Fine-tunes Quiescence Exit by Targeting Nuclear Receptors

    This article has 14 authors:
    1. Jun Yang
    2. Shitian Zou
    3. Zeyou Qiu
    4. Mingqiang Lai
    5. Qing Long
    6. Huan Chen
    7. Pinglin Lai
    8. Sheng Zhang
    9. Zhi Rao
    10. Xiaoling Xie
    11. Yan Gong
    12. Anling Liu
    13. Mangmang Li
    14. Xiaochun Bai
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study investigated the regulatory role of Mecp2 in quiescence exit during cell cycle progression. The study is significant since it provided fundamental insights into the mechanism controlling the cell cycle process. The evidence is convincing since the authors have presented experimental data from in vitro cell culture and in vivo injury-induced liver regeneration to support their conclusion.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  20. Syntaxin 17 recruitment to mature autophagosomes is temporally regulated by PI4P accumulation

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Saori Shinoda
    2. Yuji Sakai
    3. Takahide Matsui
    4. Masaaki Uematsu
    5. Ikuko Koyama-Honda
    6. Jun-ichi Sakamaki
    7. Hayashi Yamamoto
    8. Noboru Mizushima
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This paper addresses a fundamental issue in the field of autophagy: How is a protein responsible for autophagosome-lysosome fusion recruited to mature autophagosomes but not immature ones? The work succeeds in its ambition to provide a new conceptual advance. The evidence supporting the conclusions is convincing, with solid fluorescence microscopy, biochemical assays, and molecular dynamics simulations. This work will be of broad interest not only to cell biologists and biochemists studying autophagy but also those focusing on lipid/membrane biology.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity