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  1. Linking root-associated fungal and bacterial functions to root economics

    This article has 13 authors:
    1. Ran Wu
    2. Xiaoyue Zeng
    3. M. Luke McCormack
    4. Christopher W. Fernandez
    5. Yin Yang
    6. Hui Guo
    7. Meijie Xi
    8. Yu Liu
    9. Xiangbin Qi
    10. Shuang Liang
    11. Thomas E. Juenger
    12. Roger T. Koide
    13. Weile Chen
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable study advances our understanding of the below-ground resource acquisition strategies of diverse tree species, integrating the roles of both roots and their associated microbes. The support for the conclusions is incomplete owing to the uncertainties or shortcomings associated with the design and statistical analyses. Regardless of these technical issues, this study can be of broad interest for plant and microbial ecologists.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  2. Contrasting responses to aridity by different-sized decomposers cause similar decomposition rates across a precipitation gradient

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Viraj Torsekar
    2. Nevo Sagi
    3. J Alfred Daniel
    4. Yael Hawlena
    5. Efrat Gavish-Regev
    6. Dror Hawlena
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This fundamental study substantially advances our understanding of the role of different-sized soil invertebrates in shaping the rates of leaf litter decomposition, using an experiment across seasons along an aridity gradient. The authors provide compelling evidence that the summed effects of all invertebrates (with large-sized invertebrates being more active in summer and small-sized invertebrates in winter) on decomposition rates result in similar levels of leaf litter decomposition across seasons. The work will be of broad interest to ecosystem ecologists interested in soil food webs, and researchers interested in modeling carbon cycles to understand global warming.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  3. Automating an insect biodiversity metric using distributed optical sensors: an evaluation across Kansas, USA cropping systems

    This article has 14 authors:
    1. Klas Rydhmer
    2. James O. Eckberg
    3. Jonathan G. Lundgren
    4. Samuel Jansson
    5. Laurence Still
    6. John E. Quinn
    7. Ralph Washington
    8. Jesper Lemmich
    9. Thomas Nikolajsen
    10. Nikolaj Sheller
    11. Alex M. Michels
    12. Michael M. Bredeson
    13. Steven T. Rosenzweig
    14. Emily N. Bick
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents useful work comparing different techniques for monitoring insect species in agricultural settings, including a brand new one using optical sensors. That said, the data were analysed using an inadequately-described -- or potentially inadequate -- framework, and more careful thought must be given to the interpretation of the results before the new methodology can be used as a starting point for insect studies in agricultural fields and beyond.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  4. Different coexistence patterns between apex carnivores and mesocarnivores based on temporal, spatial, and dietary niche partitioning analysis in Qilian Mountain National Park, China

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Wei Cong
    2. Jia Li
    3. Charlotte Hacker
    4. Ye Li
    5. Yu Zhang
    6. Lixiao Jin
    7. Yi Zhang
    8. Diqiang Li
    9. Yadong Xue
    10. Yuguang Zhang
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This paper provides an important assessment of competition dynamics allowing coexistence of the carnivore guild within a large national park. A solid dataset and multiple surveying techniques (camera traps and DNA metabarcoding) provide convincing evidence that spatial segregation represents the main strategy of coexistence, while species have a certain degree of temporal and dietary overlap. Altogether, the manuscript provides important information critical to the conservation and management agenda of the park.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  5. The push-pull intercrop Desmodium does not repel, but intercepts and kills pests

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Anna Laura Erdei
    2. Aneth Bella David
    3. Eleni C. Savvidou
    4. Vaida Džemedžionaitė
    5. Advaith Chakravarthy
    6. Béla Péter Molnár
    7. Teun Dekker
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable study addresses both commonly accepted and alternative hypotheses for the mechanism by which an intercrop supports pest control in push-pull agriculture, a promising and broadly recognized approach for sustainable intensification. The findings address a widely recognized gap in data on the mechanism underlying push-pull systems and thus can be important for work on pest control in agroecology as well as plant-herbivore interactions more generally. The support of claims is solid, combining observations of several different mechanistic aspects in an uncommonly broad range of relevant environments with clear reasoning regarding experimental design, but also using some non-standard approaches that are not as well explained, complicating comparisons to the current state of the art.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  6. Human disturbance increases spatiotemporal associations among mountain forest terrestrial mammal species

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Xueyou Li
    2. William V. Bleisch
    3. Wenqiang Hu
    4. Quan Li
    5. Hongjiao Wang
    6. Zhongzheng Chen
    7. Ru Bai
    8. Xuelong Jiang
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      In this study, camera trapping and species distribution models are used to show that human disturbance in mountain forests in the eastern Himalayas pushes medium-sized and large mammal species into narrower habitat space, thus increasing their co-occurrence. While the collected data provide a useful basis for further work, the study presents incomplete evidence to support the claim that increased co-occurrence may indicate positive interactions between species.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  7. Pesticide-induced resurgence in brown planthopper is mediated by action on a suite of genes that promote juvenile hormone biosynthesis and female fecundity

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Yang Gao
    2. Shao-Cong Su
    3. Zhao-Yu Liu
    4. Dick R. Nässel
    5. Chris Bass
    6. Cong-Fen Gao
    7. Shun-Fan Wu
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This useful manuscript reports mechanisms behind the increase in fecundity in response to sub-lethal doses of pesticides in the crop pest, the brown plant hopper. The authors hypothesize that the pesticide works by inducing the JH titer, which through the JH signaling pathway induces egg development. Evidence for this is, however, inadequate.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  8. The larva and adult of Helicoverpa armigera use differential gustatory receptors to sense sugars

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Shuai-Shuai Zhang
    2. Pei-Chao Wang
    3. Chao Ning
    4. Ke Yang
    5. Guo-Cheng Li
    6. Lin-Lin Cao
    7. Ling-Qiao Huang
    8. Chen-Zhu Wang
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study identifies the gustatory receptors for sugar sensing in the larval and adult forms of the cotton bollworm, which is responsible for the destruction of many food crops world-wide. The authors find that the larval and adult forms utilise different receptors to sense sugars. The data are convincing and will be of interest neuroscientists working in sensory coding of sugars and to the pest management field.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  9. Habitat loss weakens the positive relationship between grassland plant richness and above-ground biomass

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Yongzhi Yan
    2. Scott Jarvie
    3. Qing Zhang
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study advances our understanding of how landscape context affects the relationship between grassland plant diversity and biomass. This study used very well-designed approaches to analyze complex ecological relationships in real-world landscapes and thus provides compelling evidence to support its findings. The work will be of interest to landscape ecologists and community ecologists.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 9 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  10. Exploring natural odour landscapes: A case study with implications for human-biting insects

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Jessica L. Zung
    2. Sumer M. Kotb
    3. Carolyn S. McBride
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This manuscript provides a useful qualitative analysis of hair extracts from mammals, with the goal of understanding how mosquitoes encode the chemicals in the odor. The data were collected using standard spectrometric approaches in the field of chemical ecology, but they suffer from artifacts associated with the sampling approach and analyses, and are limited in their replicates and sampling which may prevent inter-species comparisons at this point. Without additional analysis, the evidence supporting the claims currently remains unfortunately incomplete.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  11. Synthetic Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics in Simple Molecular Environment

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Luca Casiraghi
    2. Francesco Mambretti
    3. Anna Tovo
    4. Elvezia Maria Paraboschi
    5. Samir Suweis
    6. Tommaso Bellini
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      In this important study, the authors develop a promising experimental approach to a central question in ecology: What are the contributions of resource use and interactions in the shaping of an ecosystem? For this, they develop a synthetic ecosystem set-up, a variant of SELEX that allows very detailed control over ecological variables. The evidence is convincing, and the work should be of broad interest to the ecology community, leading to further quantitative studies.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  12. Effects of blood meal source and seasonality on reproductive traits of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    This article has 3 authors:
    1. Kevin Alen Rucci
    2. Mariana Pueta
    3. Adrián Díaz
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This useful study provides the first assessment of the potentially interactive effects of seasonality and blood source on mosquito fitness, together in one study. However, the experimental approach is incomplete because it is limited without replication of the experiments and because of the small sample sizes for some groups. The work will be of interest to those studying mosquito biology.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 12 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  13. Small deviations in kinematics and body form dictate muscle performances in the finely tuned avian downstroke

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Marc E Deetjen
    2. Diana D Chin
    3. Ashley M Heers
    4. Bret W Tobalske
    5. David Lentink
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study combines experiments and mathematical modelling to enhance our understanding of the interplay between the two flight muscles in birds during slow flight. The evidence for the findings is compelling, derived from new methods for measuring wing shape and force production combined with previously validated methods in muscle physiology. This work will be of broad interest to comparative biomechanists.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 7 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  14. Unprecedented yet gradual nature of first millennium CE intercontinental crop plant dispersal revealed in ancient Negev desert refuse

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Daniel Fuks
    2. Yoel Melamed
    3. Dafna Langgut
    4. Tali Erickson-Gini
    5. Yotam Tepper
    6. Guy Bar-Oz
    7. Ehud Weiss
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The study presents important findings on the timing and movement of crops in the Near East. The authors provide convincing data supporting a predominant contribution of Roman Agricultural Diffusion to the spread of a number of cultigens in the region. The work will be of interest to those thinking about the timing and movement of the diffusion of agricultural crops post-domestication.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  15. Investigating macroecological patterns in coarse-grained microbial communities using the stochastic logistic model of growth

    This article has 2 authors:
    1. William R Shoemaker
    2. Jacopo Grilli
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable study considers empirical macroecological patterns in microbiome data across multiple taxonomic scales. The work convincingly shows that the Stochastic Logistic Growth model is a more appropriate choice of null model than the neutral theory of biodiversity. The work will be of particular interest to microbial ecologists.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 7 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  16. Drivers of species knowledge across the tree of life

    This article has 18 authors:
    1. Stefano Mammola
    2. Martino Adamo
    3. Dragan Antić
    4. Jacopo Calevo
    5. Tommaso Cancellario
    6. Pedro Cardoso
    7. Dan Chamberlain
    8. Matteo Chialva
    9. Furkan Durucan
    10. Diego Fontaneto
    11. Duarte Goncalves
    12. Alejandro Martínez
    13. Luca Santini
    14. Iñigo Rubio-Lopez
    15. Ronaldo Sousa
    16. David Villegas-Rios
    17. Aida Verdes
    18. Ricardo A Correia
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      With a carefully collected dataset and compelling analyses, this fundamental manuscript demonstrates detailed links between societal and academic interest and natural species across the globe. In doing so, the authors reveal biases that may be diminishing our abilities to care for the species on our planet that may need our care the most. While some parts of this manuscript reflect previously published work, the authors are commended for putting all the puzzle pieces together for the first time. Their work highlights our uneven knowledge of biodiversity and its potential causes.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 7 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  17. Deciphering deep-sea chemosynthetic symbiosis by single-nucleus RNA-sequencing

    This article has 14 authors:
    1. Hao Wang
    2. Kai He
    3. Huan Zhang
    4. Quanyong Zhang
    5. Lei Cao
    6. Jing Li
    7. Zhaoshan Zhong
    8. Hao Chen
    9. Li Zhou
    10. Chao Lian
    11. Minxiao Wang
    12. Kai Chen
    13. Pei-Yuan Qian
    14. Chaolun Li
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study provides an important cell atlas of the gill of the mussel Gigantidas platifrons using a single nucleus RNA-seq dataset, a resource for the community of scientists studying deep sea physiology and metabolism and intracellular host-symbiont relationships. The work, which offers solid insights into cellular responses to starvation stress and molecular mechanisms behind deep-sea chemosymbiosis, is of relevance to scientists interested in host-symbiont relationships across ecosystems.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  18. Molecular mechanisms of microbiome modulation by the eukaryotic secondary metabolite azelaic acid

    This article has 11 authors:
    1. Ahmed A Shibl
    2. Michael A Ochsenkühn
    3. Amin R Mohamed
    4. Ashley Isaac
    5. Lisa SY Coe
    6. Yejie Yun
    7. Grzegorz Skrzypek
    8. Jean-Baptiste Raina
    9. Justin R Seymour
    10. Ahmed J Afzal
    11. Shady A Amin
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents valuable findings on the contrasting responses of two bacteria to the phytoplankton-derived compound azelaic acid. Metabolomics and transcriptomics evidence convincingly shows the assimilation pathway in one marine bacterium and a stress response in a second bacterium. The study provides evidence that azelaic acid can alter marine microbial community structure in mesocosm experiments, though the mechanisms underlying this shift in community structure remain to be explored in future studies.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 7 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  19. Landscape drives zoonotic malaria prevalence in non-human primates

    This article has 13 authors:
    1. Emilia Johnson
    2. Reuben Sunil Kumar Sharma
    3. Pablo Ruiz Cuenca
    4. Isabel Byrne
    5. Milena Salgado-Lynn
    6. Zarith Suraya Shahar
    7. Lee Col Lin
    8. Norhadila Zulkifli
    9. Nor Dilaila Mohd Saidi
    10. Chris Drakeley
    11. Jason Matthiopoulos
    12. Luca Nelli
    13. Kimberly Fornace
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This useful study presents findings regarding the impact of forest cover and fragmentation on the prevalence of malaria in non-human primates. The evidence supporting the claims of the authors is solid.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 10 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  20. Delayed postglacial colonization of Betula in Iceland and the circum North Atlantic

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. David J Harning
    2. Samuel Sacco
    3. Kesara Anamthawat-Jónsson
    4. Nicolò Ardenghi
    5. Thor Thordarson
    6. Jonathan H Raberg
    7. Julio Sepúlveda
    8. Áslaug Geirsdóttir
    9. Beth Shapiro
    10. Gifford H Miller
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable work on the paleovegetation history of Iceland has implications for the field of paleoecology, and the deglaciation history of Iceland and additional localities in Northern America and Europe via woody shrub colonization. The study uses a sedimentary ancient DNA metabarcoding approach to study this historic process. The strength of evidence is solid, with the methods (analysis of sedimentary DNA) and data analyses broadly supporting the claims.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 6 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity