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  1. Convergent Epigenetic Evolution Drives Relapse in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Kevin A. Nuno
    2. Armon Azizi
    3. Thomas Köhnke
    4. Caleb A. Lareau
    5. Asiri Ediwirickrema
    6. M. Ryan Corces
    7. Ansuman T. Satpathy
    8. Ravindra Majeti
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important work substantially advances our understanding of how resistant leukemia can arise without changes in mutational patterns by displaying epigenetic changes. The evidence supporting the conclusions is compelling, with rigorous genomic assays done on primary samples. and state-of-the-art microscopy. The work will be of broad interest to hematologists and cancer biologists.

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    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  2. Inhibition of O-GlcNAc transferase activates type I interferon-dependent antitumor immunity by bridging cGAS-STING pathway

    This article has 14 authors:
    1. Jianwen Chen
    2. Bao Zhao
    3. Tianliang Li
    4. Hong Dong
    5. Xiang Cheng
    6. Wang Gong
    7. Jing Wang
    8. Junran Zhang
    9. Gang Xin
    10. Yanbao Yu
    11. Yu L. Lei
    12. Jennifer D. Black
    13. Zihai Li
    14. Haitao Wen
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable study provides the detailed molecular mechanism of how OGT, an O-GlcNac transferase, promotes cancer progression. Using loss-of-function OGT models, the authors demonstrated that OGT cleaves HCF-1, a guardian of genomic stability. These solid findings can lead to some potential approaches to modulate anti-tumor immunity by targeting this process.

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    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  3. Telomere length sensitive regulation of Interleukin Receptor 1 type 1 (IL1R1) by the shelterin protein TRF2 modulates immune signalling in the tumour microenvironment

    This article has 21 authors:
    1. Ananda Kishore Mukherjee
    2. Subhajit Dutta
    3. Ankita Singh
    4. Shalu Sharma
    5. Shuvra Shekhar Roy
    6. Antara Sengupta
    7. Megha Chatterjee
    8. Soujanya Vinayagamurthy
    9. Sulochana Bagri
    10. Divya Khanna
    11. Meenakshi Verma
    12. Dristhi Soni
    13. Anshul Budharaja
    14. Sagar Kailasrao Bhisade
    15. Vivekanand
    16. Ahmad Perwez
    17. Nija George
    18. Mohammed Faruq
    19. Ishaan Gupta
    20. Radhakrishnan Sabarinathan
    21. Shantanu Chowdhury
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents an important finding on the role of telomeres in modulating interleukin-1 signaling and tumor immunity in TNBC. The evidence supporting these findings is solid, presented through comprehensive analyses including TNBC clinical samples, tumor-derived organoids, cancer cells, and xenografts. The work will be of broad interest to cell and medical biologists focusing on TNBC.

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    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  4. Combinatorial CRISPR screen reveals FYN and KDM4 as targets for synergistic drug combination for treating triple negative breast cancer

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Tackhoon Kim
    2. Byung-Sun Park
    3. Soobeen Heo
    4. Heeju Jeon
    5. Jaeyeal Kim
    6. Donghwa Kim
    7. Sang Kook Lee
    8. So-Youn Jung
    9. Sun-Young Kong
    10. Timothy K. Lu
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents a valuable finding on the roles and mechanisms of FYN and KDM4 in TNBC tumor cell resistance. The evidence supporting the claims of the authors is somewhat incomplete and the refinement of certain experiments would have strengthened the study. Noteworthy, FYN has been implied in drug resistance previously and this should be carefully discussed in the manuscript. The work will be of interest to scientists working on breast cancer.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  5. RBM7 deficiency promotes breast cancer metastasis by coordinating MFGE8 splicing switch and NF-kB pathway

    This article has 11 authors:
    1. Fang Huang
    2. Zhenwei Dai
    3. Jinmiao Yu
    4. Kainan Wang
    5. Chaoqun Chen
    6. Dan Chen
    7. Jinrui Zhang
    8. Jinyao Zhao
    9. Wenjing Zhang
    10. Yangfan Qi
    11. Yang Wang
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents an important finding on the splicing regulatory function of RBM7 and its functional impact in breast cancer metastasis. The evidence supporting the claims of the authors is solid, although the inclusion of more delineation of how RBM7 regulates NF-kB and coordinates splicing would have strengthened the study. The work will be of interest to scientists working on breast cancer.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  6. Large pan-cancer cell screen coupled to (phospho-)proteomics underscores high-dose vitamin C as a potent anti-cancer agent

    This article has 18 authors:
    1. Andrea Vallés-Martí
    2. Franziska Böttger
    3. Elysia Yau
    4. Khadija Tejjani
    5. Loes Meijs
    6. Sugandhi Sharma
    7. Madiha Mumtaz
    8. Tessa Y. S. Le Large
    9. Ayse Erozenci
    10. Daniëlle Dekker
    11. Tim Schelfhorst
    12. Jan Paul Medema
    13. Irene V Bijnsdorp
    14. Jaco C Knol
    15. Sander R Piersma
    16. Thang V. Pham
    17. Elisa Giovannetti
    18. Connie R Jiménez
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This useful study utilizes proteomics analysis across a large panel of 51 cancer cell lines to elucidate mechanisms underlying the sensitivity of cancer cells to high-dose vitamin C (Ascorbate). While the associations between specific molecular pathways and sensitivity to ascorbate are interesting, a major limitation is that the study is largely descriptive and incomplete, lacking evidence on the molecular underpinnings of cancer cells' sensitivity to high-dose vitamin C.

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    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  7. Disassembly of embryonic keratin filaments promotes pancreatic cancer metastases

    This article has 12 authors:
    1. Ryan R. Kawalerski
    2. Mariana Torrente Gonçalves
    3. Chun-Hao Pan
    4. Robert Tseng
    5. Lucia Roa-Peña
    6. Cindy V. Leiton
    7. Luke A. Torre-Healy
    8. Taryn Boyle
    9. Sumedha Chowdhury
    10. Natasha T. Snider
    11. Kenneth R. Shroyer
    12. Luisa F. Escobar-Hoyos
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      In this manuscript, the authors address the function of keratin 17 (K17), a marker of the most aggressive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). While this potentially useful study addresses an important area of pancreatic cancer research, the lack of evidence demonstrating nuclear localization of K17 in human PDAC and the excessive reliance on a single cell line reduce the significance of the work. Moreover, the weak phenotypes of K17 phosphosite mutants provide incomplete support for the authors' mechanistic model.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  8. Metabolite profiling of human renal cell carcinoma reveals tissue-origin dominance in nutrient availability

    This article has 21 authors:
    1. Keene L. Abbott
    2. Ahmed Ali
    3. Bradley I. Reinfeld
    4. Amy Deik
    5. Sonu Subudhi
    6. Madelyn D. Landis
    7. Rachel A. Hongo
    8. Kirsten L. Young
    9. Tenzin Kunchok
    10. Christopher S. Nabel
    11. Kayla D. Crowder
    12. Johnathan R. Kent
    13. Maria Lucia L. Madariaga
    14. Rakesh K. Jain
    15. Kathryn E. Beckermann
    16. Caroline A. Lewis
    17. Clary B. Clish
    18. Alexander Muir
    19. W. Kimryn Rathmell
    20. Jeffrey C. Rathmell
    21. Matthew G. Vander Heiden
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study provides an important finding that the local abundance of metabolites impacts the biology of the tumor microenvironment by utilizing kidney tumors from patients and adjacent normal tissues. The evidence supporting the claims of the authors is convincing although certain caveats need to be taken into consideration as the authors acknowledged in the paper. The work will be of interest to the research community working on metabolism and on kidney cancer especially.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  9. Targeting the Hippo pathway in cancers via ubiquitination dependent TEAD degradation

    This article has 41 authors:
    1. Trang H. Pham
    2. Kanika Bajaj Pahuja
    3. Thijs J. Hagenbeek
    4. Jason Zbieg
    5. Cameron L. Noland
    6. Victoria C. Pham
    7. Xiaosai Yao
    8. Christopher M. Rose
    9. Kristen Browder
    10. Ho-June Lee
    11. Mamie Yu
    12. May Liang-Chu
    13. Scott Martin
    14. Erik Verschueren
    15. Jason Li
    16. Marta H. Kubala
    17. Rina Fong
    18. Maria Lorenzo
    19. Paul Beroza
    20. Peter Hsu
    21. Sayantanee Paul
    22. Elisia Villemure
    23. Wendy Lee
    24. Tommy K. Cheung
    25. Saundra Clausen
    26. Jennifer Lacap
    27. Yuxin Liang
    28. Jason Cheng
    29. Steve Schmidt
    30. Zora Modrusan
    31. Michael Cohen
    32. James Crawford
    33. Heinrich Jasper
    34. Alan Ashworth
    35. Jennie R. Lill
    36. Shiva Malek
    37. Joachim Rudolph
    38. Ingrid E. Wertz
    39. Matthew T. Chang
    40. Xin Ye
    41. Anwesha Dey
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important and comprehensive study describes the development of a heterobifunctional degrader, which is used to provide insights into the mechanism of TEAD proteolysis, with potential implications for signaling pathways in cancer. While the methods are solid, the analyses and descriptions are still incomplete. With further molecular refinements, experimental controls, and a more cohesive and unified story, this article will be of interest to cancer biologists and scientists interested in proteostasis, cellular signaling, and post-translation modification of proteins.

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    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  10. STAT3 is a genetic modifier of TGF-beta induced EMT in KRAS mutant pancreatic cancer

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Stephen D’Amico
    2. Varvara Kirillov
    3. Oleksi Petrenko
    4. Nancy C. Reich
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study delves into the complex role of STAT3 signaling and its interplay with TGF-beta and SMAD4 in KRAS mutant pancreatic cancer. The authors demonstrate that both the presence and absence of STAT3, relative to SMAD4, can lead to poor PDAC differentiation and that STAT3 mutations affect p53-null fibroblasts with KRASG12D and induce an EMT-like phenotype. By providing convincing evidence, the authors were able to derive important insights into KRAS mutant cancers.

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    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  11. Integrative study of skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction in a murine pancreatic cancer-induced cachexia model

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Tristan Gicquel
    2. Fabio Marchiano
    3. Gabriela Reyes-Castellanos
    4. Stéphane Audebert
    5. Luc Camoin
    6. Bianca Habermann
    7. Benoit Giannesini
    8. Alice Carrier
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This useful study uses a mouse model of pancreatic cancer to examine mitochondrial mass and structure in atrophying muscle along with aspects of mitochondrial metabolism in the same tissue. Most relevant are the solid transcriptomics and proteomics approaches to map out related changes in gene expression networks in muscle during cancer cachexia.

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    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  12. TIPE drives a cancer stem-like phenotype by promoting glycolysis via PKM2/HIF-1α axis in melanoma

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Maojin Tian
    2. Le Yang
    3. Ziqian Zhao
    4. Jigang Li
    5. Lianqing Wang
    6. Qingqing Yin
    7. Wei Hu
    8. Yunwei Lou
    9. Jianxin Du
    10. Peiqing Zhao
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study investigates the molecular mechanisms underpinning how the tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein, TIPE, regulates aerobic glycolysis to promote tumor growth in melanoma. Data using multiple independent approaches provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underpinning aerobic glycolysis, also known as the Warburg Effect, in melanoma cells. The claims of the authors are solid, although more in-depth metabolic assays as well as the inclusion of melanoma patient survival analysis in TIPE high and low tumors would strengthen the study. The work will be of interest to biomedical researchers working in cancer and metabolism.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  13. Formation of malignant, metastatic small cell lung cancers through overproduction of cMYC protein in TP53 and RB1 depleted pulmonary neuroendocrine cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    This article has 8 authors:
    1. Huanhuan Joyce Chen
    2. Eric E. Gardner
    3. Yajas Shah
    4. Kui Zhang
    5. Abhimanyu Thakur
    6. Chen Zhang
    7. Olivier Elemento
    8. Harold Varmus
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      Given a great need for novel human model systems to study small cell lung cancer (SCLC), the authors describe an important pre-clinical model with broad potential for the study of how genetic perturbations or drug treatments alter SCLC tumor growth, metastasis, and response to therapy. For the major finding, the authors provide convincing evidence that RB/TP53 suppression coupled with MYC overexpression in an ES cell-derived model system results in aggressive and metastatic SCLC. However, comparisons of the RB/TP53-suppressed, MYC overexpressing model with RB/TP53-suppressed cells in supporting the minor conclusion that MYC overexpression increases the neuroendocrine compartment are incomplete, and the impact of the work would have been increased with the inclusion of a broader set of genetic perturbations, such as over-expression of MYCL, to better model major SCLC phenotypes. The new model described will be of significant interest to researchers studying lung cancer.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  14. A syngeneic spontaneous zebrafish model of tp53-deficient, EGFRviii, and PI3KCAH1047R-driven glioblastoma reveals inhibitory roles for inflammation during tumor initiation and relapse in vivo

    This article has 4 authors:
    1. Alex Weiss
    2. Cassandra D’Amata
    3. Bret J. Pearson
    4. Madeline N. Hayes
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents a valuable syngeneic zebrafish model for studying glioblastoma and will be of interest to neuro-oncologists and cancer biologists. Using a feasible in vivo model to study the tumour microenvironment, cell/cell interaction, and immunity, the data are compelling, although the study can benefit from the additional characterization of tumours, as well as non-tumour cells in the niche including microglia/macrophage population.

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    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  15. Mutant mice lacking alternatively spliced p53 isoforms unveil Ackr4 as a male-specific prognostic factor in Myc-driven B-cell lymphomas

    This article has 15 authors:
    1. Anne Fajac
    2. Iva Simeonova
    3. Julia Leemput
    4. Marc Gabriel
    5. Aurélie Morin
    6. Vincent Lejour
    7. AnnaĂŻg Hamon
    8. Wilhelm Vaysse-Zinkhöfer
    9. Eliana Eldawra
    10. Jeanne Rakotopare
    11. Marina Pinskaya
    12. Antonin Morillon
    13. Jean-Christophe Bourdon
    14. Boris Bardot
    15. Franck Toledo
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study using engineered mouse models provides a first compelling demonstration of a pathogenic phenotype associated with lack of expression of p53AS, an isoform of the p53 protein with a different C-terminus as canonical p53. The work also offers correlative evidence that Ackr4, differentially expressed in this mouse model, may be a male-specific prognostic factor in a specific type of B-cell lymphomas. Direct functional evidence testing the links proposed would better support the major findings of the study.

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    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  16. Associations of Combined Phenotypic Aging and Genetic Risk with Incident Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

    This article has 13 authors:
    1. Lijun Bian
    2. Zhimin Ma
    3. Xiangjin Fu
    4. Chen Ji
    5. Tianpei Wang
    6. Caiwang Yan
    7. Juncheng Dai
    8. Hongxia Ma
    9. Zhibin Hu
    10. Hongbing Shen
    11. Lu Wang
    12. Meng Zhu
    13. Guangfu Jin
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This is an important study on the role of phenotypic aging in cancer risk. It presents results that show that Phenotypic Age Acceleration (PhenoAgeAccel) can predict cancer incidence of different types and could be used with genetic risk to facilitate the identification of cancer-susceptible individuals. This article presents solid results that would be of broad interest to the research community and clinicians.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  17. Tissue-resident NK cells support survival in pancreatic cancer through promotion of cDC1-CD8T activity

    This article has 14 authors:
    1. Simei Go
    2. Constantinos Demetriou
    3. Sophie Hughes
    4. Simone Lanfredini
    5. Giampiero Valenzano
    6. Helen Ferry
    7. Edward Arbe-Barnes
    8. Shivan Sivakumar
    9. Rachael Bashford-Rogers
    10. Mark R. Middleton
    11. Somnath Mukherjee
    12. Jennifer Morton
    13. Keaton Jones
    14. Eric O’Neill
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment:

      This valuable manuscript by Go et al. provides an interesting account documenting the role of resident CD56(br) NK cells in driving interaction with DCs that attract CD8+ T cells to the pancreas cancer tumor microenvironment (TME). The work convincingly illustrates how irradiation combined with CCR5i and PD1 blockade leads to a reduction in pancreatic cancer growth that correlates with a reduction in Tregs and enhancement of NK and CD8 T cells in the TME. The correlation of NKC1 signature with survival in pancreatic cancer patients is indeed of broader interest regarding potential relevance to other types of cancer.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  18. Cannabinoid Combination Targets NOTCH1 -Mutated T-ALL Through the Integrated Stress Response Pathway

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Elazar Besser
    2. Anat Gelfand
    3. Shiri Procaccia
    4. Paula Berman
    5. David Meiri
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study follows up on previous work defining the anti-leukemic effects of a previously characterized cannabis extract on Notch-activated T cells and identifies several pathways that mediate its anti-cancer activity including the ER calcium and integrated stress response. The evidence is solid, but several concerns remain including the over reliance on a single cell line for the majority of the studies and lack of integration of the observations with existing literature

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 6 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  19. mitoBK Ca is functionally expressed in murine and human breast cancer cells and potentially contributes to metabolic reprogramming

    This article has 23 authors:
    1. Helmut Bischof
    2. Selina Maier
    3. Piotr Koprowski
    4. Bogusz Kulawiak
    5. Sandra Burgstaller
    6. Joanna Jasińska
    7. Kristian Serafimov
    8. Monika Zochowska
    9. Dominic Gross
    10. Werner Schroth
    11. Lucas Matt
    12. David Arturo Juarez Lopez
    13. Ying Zhang
    14. Irina Bonzheim
    15. Florian A. BĂĽttner
    16. Falko Fend
    17. Matthias Schwab
    18. Andreas L. Birkenfeld
    19. Roland Malli
    20. Michael Lämmerhofer
    21. Piotr Bednarczyk
    22. Adam Szewczyk
    23. Robert Lukowski
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The large-conductance Ca2+ activated K+ channel has been reported to promote breast cancer progression. The present study presents convincing evidence that an intracellular subpopulation of this channel reprograms breast cancer cells towards the Warburg phenotype, one of the metabolic hallmarks of cancer. This important finding advances the field of cancer cell metabolism and has potential therapeutic implications. However, additional experiments are needed to ascribe the metabolic reprogramming to BK channels located in mitochondria.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  20. mTORC1/S6K1 signaling promotes sustained oncogenic translation through modulating CRL3 IBTK -mediated non-degradative ubiquitination of eIF4A1

    This article has 9 authors:
    1. Dongyue Jiao
    2. Huiru Sun
    3. Xiaying Zhao
    4. Yingji Chen
    5. Zeheng Lv
    6. Qing Shi
    7. Yao Li
    8. Chenji Wang
    9. Kun Gao
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The findings in this fundamental study identify a novel substrate and mediator of oncogenesis downstream of mTORC1 and advance our understanding of the mechanistic basis of mTORC1-regulated cap-dependent translation and protein synthesis. The authors present convincing data using an array of biochemical, proteomic, and functional assays. These studies are of broad relevance to biochemists and cancer biologists and have potential translational relevance in cancer.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity