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  1. Natural genetic variation underlying the negative effect of elevated CO 2 on ionome composition in Arabidopsis thaliana

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Océane Cassan
    2. Léa-Lou Pimparé
    3. Timothy Mozzanino
    4. CĂ©cile Fizames
    5. SĂ©bastien Devidal
    6. Fabrice Roux
    7. Alexandru Milcu
    8. Sophie Lèbre
    9. Alain Gojon
    10. Antoine Martin
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This paper provides useful information about how the ionome of Arabidopsis thaliana adapts to very high CO2-levels, backed up by solid evidence and carefully designed studies. However, the broader claims of the paper about climate change and food security - heavily emphasized in the abstract, introduction, and discussion - are inappropriate, as there is no direct link to the presented work.

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    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  2. Archaeal origin translation proofreader imparts multialdehyde stress tolerance to land plants

    This article has 12 authors:
    1. Pradeep Kumar
    2. Ankit Roy
    3. Shivapura Jagadeesha Mukul
    4. Avinash Kumar Singh
    5. Dipesh Kumar Singh
    6. Aswan Nalli
    7. Pujaita Banerjee
    8. Kandhalu Sagadevan Dinesh Babu
    9. Bakthisaran Raman
    10. Shobha P. Kruparani
    11. Imran Siddiqi
    12. Rajan Sankaranarayanan
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      The work is a useful contribution towards understanding the role of archaeal and plant D-aminoacyl-tRNA deacylase 2 (DTD2) in deacylation and detoxification of D-Tyr-tRNATyr modified by various aldehydes produced as metabolic byproducts in plants. It integrates convincing results from both in vitro and in vivo experiments to address the long-standing puzzle of why plants outperform bacteria in handling reactive aldehydes and suggests a new strategy for stress-tolerant crops. The impact of the paper is limited by the fact that only one modified D-aminoacyl tRNA was examined, in lack of evidence that plant eEF1A mimics EF-Tu in protecting L-aminoacyl tRNAs from modification, and in failure to measure accumulation of toxic D-aminoacyl tRNAs or impairment of translation in plant cells lacking DTD2.

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    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  3. Rapid redirection of auxin fluxes during root gravitropism by translocation of NGR proteins driving polarization of PIN-activating kinases

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Ivan Kulich
    2. Julia Schmid
    3. Anastasia Teplova
    4. Linlin Qi
    5. Jiří Friml
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This fundamental study addresses the earliest events that enable plant roots to reorient growth in response to gravity. Compelling molecular and cell biological data establish that plasma membrane localization of the LAZY or NEGATIVE GRAVITROPIC RESPONSE OF ROOTS (NGR) protein family is required for rapid and polar redirection of D6 protein kinase, an activator of the PIN3 auxin transporter. This work complements recent publications on the NGR family in gravity sensing (Chen et al., PMID: 37741279 and Nishimura et al., PMID: 37561884). Collectively these papers advance our understanding of rapid plant gravity sensing and response.

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    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  4. Heat stress impairs centromere structure and segregation of meiotic chromosomes in Arabidopsis

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Lucie Crhak Khaitova
    2. Pavlina Mikulkova
    3. Jana Pecinkova
    4. Manikandan Kalidass
    5. Stefan Heckmann
    6. Inna Lermontova
    7. Karel Riha
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study reports how heat stress affects centromere integrity by compromising the loading of the centromere protein CENH3 and by prolonging the spindle assembly checkpoint during male meiosis in Arabidopsis thaliana. The evidence supporting the claims by live cell imaging is convincing, although deeper mechanistic insight is lacking, making the study overall somewhat preliminary in nature. This work will be of interest to a broad audience of biologists working on how chromatin states are affected by stress conditions.

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    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  5. H1 restricts euchromatin-associated methylation pathways from heterochromatic encroachment

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. C. Jake Harris
    2. Zhenhui Zhong
    3. Lucia Ichino
    4. Suhua Feng
    5. Steven E. Jacobsen
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important paper reports on the redistribution of Pol V and DNA methylation from euchromatic to heterochromatic regions in H1 mutants. While some of the evidence is solid, other parts of the genome-level model proposed to explain the molecular phenotype of H1 mutants (which includes a reduction of DNA methylation at some euchromatic sites) would benefit from additional experimental support. The work will be of broad interest to individuals interested in the mechanisms that have evolved to partition eukaryotic genomes into euchromatic and heterochromatic regions.

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    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  6. Interdependence of a kinase and its cognate substrate plasma membrane nanoscale dynamics underlies Arabidopsis response to viral infection

    This article has 22 authors:
    1. Marie-Dominique Jolivet
    2. Anne-Flore Deroubaix
    3. Marie Boudsocq
    4. Nikolaj B. Abel
    5. Marion Rocher
    6. Terezinha Robbe
    7. Valérie Wattelet-Boyer
    8. Jennifer Huard
    9. Dorian Lefebvre
    10. Yi-Ju Lu
    11. Brad Day
    12. Grégoire Saias
    13. Jahed Ahmed
    14. Valérie Cotelle
    15. Nathalie Giovinazzo
    16. Jean-Luc Gallois
    17. Yasuyuki Yamaji
    18. Sylvie German-Retana
    19. Julien Gronnier
    20. Thomas Ott
    21. SĂ©bastien Mongrand
    22. VĂ©ronique Germain
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study describes how the composition and stabilization of nanodomains in the plasma membrane are an integral part of plant defence against viruses, with a focus on the calcium-dependent kinase CPK3 and its apparent interaction with a plasma-membrane nano domain scaffold protein from the remorin family. While the evidence for a specific role of CPK3 in limiting viral spread is convincing, the claims regarding the CPK3-remorin interaction would be strengthened by additional experimental support. The work, which will be of interest to plant cell biologists and plant virology, opens new avenues for understanding the role of plasma membrane nanodomains in limiting viral spread.

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    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  7. Vicia faba TPC1, a genetically encoded variant of the vacuole Two Pore Channel 1, is hyperexcitable

    This article has 12 authors:
    1. Jinping Lu
    2. Ingo Dreyer
    3. Miles Sasha Dickinson
    4. Sabine Panzer
    5. Dawid Jaslan
    6. Carlos Navarro-Retamal
    7. Dietmar Geiger
    8. Ulrich Terpitz
    9. Dirk Becker
    10. Robert M. Stroud
    11. Irene Marten
    12. Rainer Hedrich
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      Plant intracellular ion channels are poorly understood. In this important manuscript, patch-clamp is used to define functional differences between two cation channels present in the vacuole of different plants. The authors find a calcium-biding site whose absence or presence modulate activation at lower voltages and is responsible for increased excitability in the vacuole of the faba bean plant. The experimental evidence presented is convincing and findings have practical implications for the field of plant electrophysiology and channel biophysics.

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    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  8. High-resolution kinetics of herbivore-induced plant volatile transfer reveal clocked response patterns in neighboring plants

    This article has 5 authors:
    1. Jamie M. Waterman
    2. Tristan M. Cofer
    3. Lei Wang
    4. Gaétan Glauser
    5. Matthias Erb
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This important study examines the effects of herbivory-induced maize volatiles on neighboring plants and their responses over time. Measurements of volatile compound classes and gene expression in receiver plants exposed to these volatiles led to the conclusion that the delayed emission of certain terpenes in receiver plants after the onset of light may be a result of stress memory, highlighting the role of priming and induction in plant defenses triggered by herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs). Most experimental data are compelling but additional experiments and accurate quantifications of the compounds would be required to confirm some of the main claims.

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    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  9. Characterization of Tryptophan Oxidation Affecting D1 Degradation by FtsH in the Photosystem II Quality Control of Chloroplasts

    This article has 13 authors:
    1. Yusuke Kato
    2. Hiroshi Kuroda
    3. Shin-Ichiro Ozawa
    4. Keisuke Saito
    5. Vivek Dogra
    6. Martin Scholz
    7. Guoxian Zhang
    8. Catherine de Vitry
    9. Hiroshi Ishikita
    10. Chanhong Kim
    11. Michael Hippler
    12. Yuichiro Takahashi
    13. Wataru Sakamoto
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment:

      This study adds a fundamental new perspective to a long-standing question: What controls the repair of photosystem II (PSII), a key process in maintaining and optimizing photosynthesis? The work supports a role for chemical modification in the recognition and subsequent degradation of a key protein subunit of PSII by a bacterial-type protease, suggesting that tryptophan oxidation of components of the photosynthetic apparatus after high light stress plays a critical role in initiating the PSII repair system. The evidence supporting the authors' conclusions is solid.

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    This article has 9 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  10. Competence for transcellular infection in the root cortex involves a post-replicative, cell-cycle exit decision in Medicago truncatula

    This article has 10 authors:
    1. Morgane Batzenschlager
    2. Beatrice Lace
    3. Ning Zhang
    4. Chao Su
    5. Sabrina Egli
    6. Pascal Krohn
    7. Jule Salfeld
    8. Franck Anicet Ditengou
    9. Thomas Laux
    10. Thomas Ott
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This is a fundamental cell biological study of host responses during symbiotic microbial infection of plants. Compelling imaging-based approaches using genetically-encoded cell cycle markers show that in Medicago truncatula root cortex cells, early rhizobial infection events are associated with cell-cycle re-entry, but once the infection is established, host cells exit the cell cycle. The work will be of interest to a wide range of colleagues, from development and cell biology to plant-microbe interactions.

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    This article has 8 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  11. The structural repertoire of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici effectors revealed by experimental and computational studies

    This article has 11 authors:
    1. Daniel S. Yu
    2. Megan A. Outram
    3. Ashley Smith
    4. Carl L. McCombe
    5. Pravin B. Khambalkar
    6. Sharmin A. Rima
    7. Xizhe Sun
    8. Lisong Ma
    9. Daniel J. Ericsson
    10. David A. Jones
    11. Simon J. Williams
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study provides important new insights into the structural diversity of effectors - proteins secreted by pathogens and symbionts into host cells - from the plant-associated fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. The study provides a convincing approach to understand how effectors navigate their host environment using both computational and experimental approaches to understand how their structure influences binding partners. The work will be of interest to those studying molecular host-microbe interactions and disease protection.

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    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  12. The AUX1-AFB1-CNGC14 module establishes longitudinal root surface pH profile

    This article has 9 authors:
    1. Nelson BC Serre
    2. Daša Wernerová
    3. Pruthvi Vittal
    4. Shiv Mani Dubey
    5. Eva Medvecká
    6. Adriana Jelínková
    7. Jan Petrášek
    8. Guido Grossmann
    9. Matyáš Fendrych
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents valuable findings that relate the pH pattern along the root surface of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana to the auxin response and gravitropic (changes in growth orientation) response. The evidence supporting the claims of the authors is solid, based on the observation of dynamic responses at a second-to-minute time scale and the systematic correlation between the observed changes in the longitudinal surface pH profile and changes in growth rate. The work will be of interest to a wide range of plant biologists working on plant development and responses to the environment.

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    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity
  13. ECS1 and ECS2 regulate polyspermy and suppress the formation of haploid plants by promoting double fertilization

    This article has 7 authors:
    1. Yanbo Mao
    2. Thomas Nakel
    3. Isil Erbasol Serbes
    4. Dawit G. Tekleyohans
    5. Saurabh Joshi
    6. Thomas Baum
    7. Rita GroĂź-Hardt
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment:

      This important study convincingly shows that the endopeptidases ECS1 and ECS2 repress the formation of polyspermy-derived triparental offspring and haploid induction by promoting double fertilization. While the underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated, the data presented in this study represent a valuable foundation for understanding the regulation of offspring genome size. This study will be of particular interest to the large community of scientists who are interested in plant reproduction and breeding.

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    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  14. Cell type-specific control of secondary cell wall formation by Musashi-type translational regulators in Arabidopsis

    This article has 17 authors:
    1. Alicia Kairouani
    2. Dominique Pontier
    3. Claire Picart
    4. Fabien Mounet
    5. Yves Martinez
    6. Lucie Le-Bot
    7. Mathieu Fanuel
    8. Philippe Hammann
    9. Lucid Belmudes
    10. RĂ©my Merret
    11. Jacinthe Azevedo
    12. Marie-Christine Carpentier
    13. Dominique Gagliardi
    14. Yohann Couté
    15. Richard Sibout
    16. Natacha Bies-Etheve
    17. Thierry Lagrange
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      Secondary cell walls support vascular plants and conduct water throughout the plant body, and are crucial resources for lignocellulosic feedstocks. Here the authors present convincing genetic and biochemical evidence that secondary cell wall synthesis, known already to be under complex transcriptional control, is also controlled post-transcriptionally by MUSASHI-like RNA-binding proteins. These important results point to a new mechanism for control of secondary cell wall synthesis, which will be interesting to cell biologists and biochemists studying and attempting to manipulate plant biomass.

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    This article has 9 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  15. Plant secondary metabolite-dependent plant-soil feedbacks can improve crop yield in the field

    This article has 11 authors:
    1. Valentin Gfeller
    2. Jan Waelchli
    3. Stephanie Pfister
    4. Gabriel Deslandes-HĂ©rold
    5. Fabio Mascher
    6. Gaétan Glauser
    7. Yvo Aeby
    8. Adrien Mestrot
    9. Christelle A.M. Robert
    10. Klaus Schlaeppi
    11. Matthias Erb
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents findings that are important for understanding plant-soil feedbacks in agriculture. The authors use a large-scale agricultural field experiment to demonstrate the role of root-emitted secondary metabolites in enhancing the yield of the next crop. By using a benzoxazinoid-deficient maize genotype, the authors provide compelling evidence that biomass production and grain yield of several wheat varieties can be increased when grown in soil conditioned by maize plants able to release benzoxazinoids.

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    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 3 listsLatest version Latest activity
  16. A dual function of the IDA peptide in regulating cell separation and modulating plant immunity at the molecular level

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Vilde Olsson Lalun
    2. Maike Breiden
    3. Sergio Galindo-Trigo
    4. Elwira Smakowska-Luzan
    5. RĂĽdiger Simon
    6. Melinka A. Butenko
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable study provides insights into the IDA peptide with dual functions in development and immunity. The approach used is solid and helps to define the role of IDA in a two-step process, cell separation followed by activation of innate defenses. The main limitation of the study is the lack of direct evidence linking signaling by IDA and its HAE receptors to immunity. As such the work remains descriptive but it will nevertheless be of interest to a wide range of plant cell biologists.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  17. Plant Arbovirus Mobilizes a Vector Salivary Protein to Initiate Plant Infection

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Jing Zhao
    2. Jie Yang
    3. Xiangyi Meng
    4. Rongxiang Fang
    5. Yan Huo
    6. Lili Zhang
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study presents a useful set of experiments to test how a salivary protein might facilitate planthopper-transmitted rice stripe virus infection by interfering with callose deposition. If the conclusions can be confirmed, the study will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms mediating tripartite virus-insect vector-plant interactions and would be of general interest in plant science research. Whereas most experimental data is compelling, the conclusions rely on inadequate evidence for the salivary protein carbonic anhydrase being present two weeks post injection in the plant, which seems unlikely.

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    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  18. Adenylnucleotide-mediated binding of the PII-like protein SbtB contributes to controlling activity of the cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporter SbtA

    This article has 6 authors:
    1. Britta Förster
    2. Bratati Mukherjee
    3. Loraine M. Rourke
    4. Joe A. Kaczmarski
    5. Colin J. Jackson
    6. G. Dean Price
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This study is of fundamental importance, addressing the regulation of the carbon concentrating mechanism in cyanobacteria. It is a well-controlled investigation of low affinity regulatory binding of small molecules, processes that are typically difficult to examine. The work provides compelling evidence that the adenylate pool, rather than any single metabolite, regulates a key bicarbonate transporter (SbtA) to provide efficient bicarbonate supply while preventing futile cycling that can result from escape of unfixed CO2.

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    This article has 4 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  19. Glutaredoxin regulation of primary root growth is associated with early drought stress tolerance in pearl millet

    This article has 34 authors:
    1. Carla de la Fuente
    2. Alexandre Grondin
    3. Bassirou Sine
    4. Marilyne Debieu
    5. Christophe Belin
    6. Amir Hajjarpoor
    7. Jonathan A. Atkinson
    8. Sixtine Passot
    9. Marine Salson
    10. Julie Orjuela
    11. Christine Tranchant-Dubreuil
    12. Jean-RĂ©my Brossier
    13. Maxime Steffen
    14. Charlotte Morgado
    15. Hang Ngan Dinh
    16. Bipin K. Pandey
    17. Julie Darmau
    18. Antony Champion
    19. Anne-Sophie Petitot
    20. Celia Barrachina
    21. Marine Pratlong
    22. Thibault Mounier
    23. Princia Nakombo-Gbassault
    24. Pascal Gantet
    25. Prakash Gangashetty
    26. Yann Guédon
    27. Vincent Vadez
    28. Jean-Philippe Reichheld
    29. Malcolm J. Bennett
    30. Ndjido Kane
    31. Soazig Guyomarc’h
    32. Darren M. Wells
    33. Yves Vigouroux
    34. Laurent Laplaze
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This is an important paper that combines methods ranging from agronomy and plant breeding to Arabidopsis functional genetics, to construct a plausible argument that polymorphism in a single gene affects crop yield by affecting root cell elongation and drought stress resilience in a poorly studied crop. The overall argument is plausible but rests on a diverse set of claims that are supported by solid, but also partly incomplete evidence.

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    This article has 3 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity
  20. Genome editing of an African elite rice variety confers resistance against endemic and emerging Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae strains

    This article has 21 authors:
    1. Van Schepler-Luu
    2. Coline Sciallano
    3. Melissa Stiebner
    4. Chonghui Ji
    5. Gabriel Boulard
    6. Amadou Diallo
    7. Florence Auguy
    8. Si Nian Char
    9. Yugander Arra
    10. Kyrylo Schenstnyi
    11. Marcel Buchholzer
    12. Eliza P.I. Loo
    13. Atugonza L. Bilaro
    14. David Lihepanyama
    15. Mohammed Mkuya
    16. Rosemary Murori
    17. Ricardo Oliva
    18. Sebastien Cunnac
    19. Bing Yang
    20. Boris Szurek
    21. Wolf B. Frommer
    This article has been curated by 1 group:
    • Curated by eLife

      eLife assessment

      This valuable study shows that new, virulent genotypes of Xanthomonas oryze pv. oryzae, that are similar to strains present in east Asia, cause outbreaks of bacterial blight of rice in Tanzania. The authors' use of CRISPR-based gene editing on multiple pathogen targets in an elite African rice variety to create lines resistant to both endemic and emerging pathogen strains in Africa makes for a compelling contribution to meet this alarming development. The work describing the new strains of the pathogen is solid but could be stronger if there were genome sequence data for all strains examined and a clearer presentation of recent disease outbreaks and their severity.

    Reviewed by eLife

    This article has 5 evaluationsAppears in 2 listsLatest version Latest activity